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Tokyo Olympics 2020(1)


dino_jr
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2 hours ago, Sidewaysbob said:

I think the target is 14 golds. Which I think we can do with the boxing. 

 

In fact if you look at the table the British squad is performing well above its weight. We're streets ahead of the rest of Europe and not far behind Australia 

 

The lottery funding, whilst targeted disproportionately at big ticket sports like cycling and rowing. Has made a massive difference to our sporting landscape. Allowing the likes of BMX and shooting to produce medals. 

 

Of all the things lottery money could have been spent on, I think the choice of sport has been a wise one.


yeah, but I read that BMX didn’t get much funding for a long time under the system of focusing on medals because they didn’t win in previous games.  Shriever relied on crowdfunding for a while before the Cycling body convinced UK Sport of diverting some funding to BMX women.  The funding is supposed to change for Paris onwards, with more sports getting funded, the focus on medal has lost sight a bit of participation and accessibility.  Success triathlon, swimming and cycling is great because most people can do it, compared with rowing and equestrian.
 

It’s interesting hearing Hoy say that Dutch success in track cycling was built on BMX talent.  Didn’t know they transferred like that.

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17 minutes ago, Loik V credern said:

Blimey this speed climbing, they literally look like they're computer animated enhanced mutants from some low budget film, it's freaky to watch. 

It was brilliant. I'd been looking forward to it after stumbling across videos of Shauna Coxsey on Facebook (who's competing tomorrow I believe). A little disappointed they didn't show more of the other two disciplines in the highlights that were just on the BBC - they're obviously less immediately exciting, but I love seeing the problem-solving involved.

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On 02/08/2021 at 09:01, jonamok said:


But then there’d be no little metre markers or OR/WR markers in the sandpit?

 

They could do CG markers these days with an instant reaction to the takeoff, no probs! Probably even project them next to the sandpit in real life too. But I have to say, I don't want them to get rid of the take-off board. It adds a whole other level of skill to the event.

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To the uninitiated the skateboarding commentary really sounds like one of those fake comedy voice overs where someone’s making up random nonsense, like I’ve seen done for the gymnastics and dressage:

 

“Layback front side rock and roll. Backside air. Feeble grind to fakie. Pumping around. Look at that stale fish. Tucking in the tail. More backside air. Oh! Peanut in both directions!”

 

Probably because a good chunk sounds like thinly veiled fart puns.😆

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Good grief, in the skateboarding Sky Brown is so very good. Head and shoulders above most of the competition - just pulling tricks that the others aren't going near every chance she gets. There's been a lot of fairly average stuff, (far beyond my ability admittedly) but she is properly fucking ace.

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Yeah I'm still not 100% on scoring skateboarding but it's fantastic to see these young girls absolutely ripping on a world stage. Can't wait for the mens park tomorrow, should be lit.

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I watched the first couple of heats in the skateboarding last night (so didn't see Sky Brown) and thought it was, in the main, pretty dull. And I'm not basing it on what video games do, because I've never played a Tony Hawks game.

 

I don't doubt that there was some skill on display, but as a spectator I was non-plussed.

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there was one Polish lady who seemed to have anti gravity boots on and I thought the rope must be heaving her up - her strength to weight ratio must be huge as she looks like she is floating up

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I've only watched a little bit of the skateboarding qualifiers so far but it's miles more entertaining than the previous event. Looking forward to catching up with the final(s) this evening.

 

The sheer range of ability on show is a little bit odd though, compared to most of the other events. I realise it's a relatively new competitive sport, and brand new at the Olympics, but I did have to wonder why/how some of them were there. There was a woman from South Africa in the qualifier I was watching that wasn't really attempting any tricks at all and was seemingly pleased to just be able to negotiate the course, and was then equally delighted with her scores of 5 and 7, versus practically everyone else on 30 - 44. She was having the time of her life, but then probably so would I, frankly. If a country doesn't really have anyone that's especially good at a sport, relative to the global standard, don't they just end up without anyone qualifying for the Olympics, or is a country entitled to places regardless? I suppose, thinking about it, this is just Eddie the Eagle again, isn't it, and that answers my question?

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7 minutes ago, Plissken said:

Watched some Speed Climbing.

 

How the hell do they do that so quickly?  Do they study a map beforehand and just commit it to memory or something?

 

Looks like they are not aware of the design prior to the event according to this BBC Reporter:

 

 

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It’s about representation.  Eddie the Eagle is an outlier because he was doing an alpine sport under a British flag, it’s hardly going to inspire the next generation but there are plenty of South African kids who might pick up a skateboard after seeing it at the Olympics. 

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I take your point but I slightly wonder, to be honest, if having the sole representative of your country finishing last by an absolute country mile is going to be all that inspiring, versus just seeing the sport at the Olympics in the first place.

 

Looking it up, it seems there was a rule instituted specifically in reaction to Eddie the Eagle that required competitors to be participating in international events and within a certain range of the upper echelons in order to enter. I suppose that this is either waived or less effective in skateboarding's case, because it's so relatively new.

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Caster Semenya attempted to qualify for both the 200m and 5k (where there is no limit on testosterone levels for women athletes) but couldn't meet the Olympic qualifying time for either, so there are definitely strict entry requirements for most, if not all, events.

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1 hour ago, Fry Crayola said:

I believe the wall is always the same, the test being how fast you can do that standard climb rather than working out a route.

Yeah this is what I thought, the lead wall is a total surprise which they only see as they walk up to it. The bouldering I think they get forewarning though?

 

Annoying they only seem to be showing the speed part, which is the least interesting to anyone who knows a little about climbing.

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11 minutes ago, Pete said:

Yeah this is what I thought, the lead wall is a total surprise which they only see as they walk up to it. The bouldering I think they get forewarning though?

 

Annoying they only seem to be showing the speed part, which is the least interesting to anyone who knows a little about climbing.

 

I think that you mean the "normal" climbing which was on the Red Button last night.  I found it fascinating - it's not really about the competitors against each other as seeing them trying to get to the top.  As competitor after competitor fell, I had massive sympathy for them.  It looks really, really bloody painful.  (The only thing I would have liked more is a side angle because they are doing it at 35 degrees off the vertical which makes it even more ridiculously difficult.)

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1 hour ago, hmm said:

I take your point but I slightly wonder, to be honest, if having the sole representative of your country finishing last by an absolute country mile is going to be all that inspiring, versus just seeing the sport at the Olympics in the first place.

 

Looking it up, it seems there was a rule instituted specifically in reaction to Eddie the Eagle that required competitors to be participating in international events and within a certain range of the upper echelons in order to enter. I suppose that this is either waived or less effective in skateboarding's case, because it's so relatively new.

They mentioned that the women had requested to be scored on the same basis as the men, which will have reduced the scores too, but yeah, I watched that last night (Melissa Williams, wasn't it?) who was just casually moving around the course and did nothing. Mind you, there were quite a lot of sub-10 scores (although others were mainly due to falls ending a run). 

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2 hours ago, hmm said:

There was a woman from South Africa in the qualifier I was watching that wasn't really attempting any tricks at all and was seemingly pleased to just be able to negotiate the course, and was then equally delighted with her scores of 5 and 7, versus practically everyone else on 30 - 44. She was having the time of her life, but then probably so would I, frankly. If a country doesn't really have anyone that's especially good at a sport, relative to the global standard, don't they just end up without anyone qualifying for the Olympics, or is a country entitled to places regardless? I suppose, thinking about it, this is just Eddie the Eagle again, isn't it, and that answers my question?

 

Melissa Williams qualified as a continental representative - basically, the IOC trying to ensure that every continent has a competitor at each event, if possible.

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2 hours ago, hmm said:

I take your point but I slightly wonder, to be honest, if having the sole representative of your country finishing last by an absolute country mile is going to be all that inspiring, versus just seeing the sport at the Olympics in the first place.

 

Looking it up, it seems there was a rule instituted specifically in reaction to Eddie the Eagle that required competitors to be participating in international events and within a certain range of the upper echelons in order to enter. I suppose that this is either waived or less effective in skateboarding's case, because it's so relatively new.


Even the mainstream events tend to half a massive gulf between the medalists and the worst competitors. Things like the 10,000m tend to have about five realistic medal contenders out of a field of about 25, and the slowest are getting lapped and a good two minutes behind the winner.

I looked up Melissa Williams and she’s ranked 45th in the world for that event (out of 495) and wins the African continental championships every time she enters (but is then usually 20th of 20 in the world championships, presumably getting in by winning her regional event), so isn’t exactly an Eddie The Eagle or even taking advantage of loopholes. Seems more likely that Africa probably just doesn’t have much of a skateboarding scene and so she’s winning legitimate competitions against very weak fields and racking up world ranking points accordingly.

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1 hour ago, Naysonymous said:

It’s about representation.  Eddie the Eagle is an outlier because he was doing an alpine sport under a British flag, it’s hardly going to inspire the next generation but there are plenty of South African kids who might pick up a skateboard after seeing it at the Olympics. 

 

1 hour ago, hmm said:

Looking it up, it seems there was a rule instituted specifically in reaction to Eddie the Eagle that required competitors to be participating in international events and within a certain range of the upper echelons in order to enter. I suppose that this is either waived or less effective in skateboarding's case, because it's so relatively new.

 

I don't think these two are good comparisons to anyone competing in the skateboarding, but if we're talking about outsider/wildcard athletes being applauded for just participating and then having an effect on the sport in their home countries, maybe Eric Moussambani (Eric the Eel) is a better example than Eddie the Eagle. To my knowledge Eddie did not lead to a lot of British ski-jump participation (though his records have long since been surpassed), whereas after Sydney 2000, apparently Equatorial Guinea gained 50m swimming pools and a formal swimming organisation (with Eric as a coach).

 

As for people who gamed the system to make it in despite not being of the expected standard, there was Elizabeth Swaney in the skiing halfpipe at the 2018 winter Olympics:

 

Quote

Swaney qualified for the 2018 Winter Olympics representing Hungary in half-pipe skiing.[7] Beginning in 2013[8] she attended all the World Cup qualifying events over the two Olympic qualifying years, and the 2017 World Championship in Sierra Nevada, Spain. In order to qualify for the Olympics, athletes needed to place in the top 30 at either a FIS Freestyle Ski World Cup event or FIS Freestyle World Ski Championships, and score a minimum of 50.00 FIS points.[9] Swaney achieved this by attending competitions with fewer than thirty participants,[6] with one event in China having fifteen (in which she placed thirteenth). Thirteen of her top 30 finishes were a result of her showing up, not falling, and recording a score.[10] As a result of Swaney's selection of competitions, she was ranked 34th in her run up to the Olympics.[6] The Olympic quota system also aided in her qualifying. While 24 women were able to compete in half-pipe competition, there are limits on the number of skiers each country could send. The maximum a country could send was twenty-six (with maximums of fourteen men and fourteen women) across all freestyle skiing events.[11] So while the United States had six women ranked within the top 20 in the world in halfpipe skiing, only four were allowed to compete in the Olympics based on the quota system. Between the quota system and injuries, Swaney's ranking of 34 granted her qualification for the Olympics.[6][12]

 

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2 hours ago, grounded_dreams said:

 

Looks like they are not aware of the design prior to the event according to this BBC Reporter:

 

 

 

That's likely for the lead climbing or bouldering parts of the event.

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22 minutes ago, Fry Crayola said:

 

Melissa Williams qualified as a continental representative - basically, the IOC trying to ensure that every continent has a competitor at each event, if possible.


Yeah, they want to have a bit of a spread at the Olympics. If you just had the absolute top competitors there’d only be six countries represented, including eight Americans and six Japanese, plus an Aussie, a Brit, a Finn and three Brazilians.

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18 minutes ago, Danster said:

The final was of a higher  quality - also a highlight of the game for me for their sportsmanship and joy in competing.

My absolute favourite thing is seeing how happy all the skaters are when someone does something amazing. Similar with the BMX freestyle.

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My above post was not what I originally came in this topic to post! I wanted to say that I caught up with the BBC's overnight broadcasts of the qualifiers (at least the ones they showed on BBC1) and the finals of the skateboarding, without having the result spoiled. Very tense conclusion, coming down to the very last trick by the 4th placed Sakura Yosozumi!

 

I wondered why, when skaters fell early in their first or second run, the timer disappeared and they didn't get up and try and do a couple more tricks. I know they'd be shaken from a fall, and that it breaks their rhythm and stops them from doing their planned run, but it couldn't hurt to add a few more points to their initial "safety" run's score? But apparently the rule is that a fall automatically ends the run. The American was the one I saw carrying on after a fall, and that seemed mainly to play to the camera rather than to add to her score.

 

 

 

Then after catching up with that, I turned on the live TV and Johnson-Thompson had just had her injury. :(

 

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