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Prisoners of the Ghostland - Escape From New York meets Mad Max - NIC CAGE


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Described by Cage himself as the wildest movie he's ever made. 

 

“In the treacherous frontier city of Samurai Town, a ruthless bank robber (Nicolas Cage) is sprung from jail by wealthy warlord The Governor (Bill Moseley), whose adopted granddaughter Bernice (Sofia Boutella) has gone missing,” reads the synopsis of the film. “The Governor offers the prisoner his freedom in exchange for retrieving the runaway. Strapped into a leather suit that will self-destruct within five days, the bandit sets off on a journey to find the young woman—and his own path to redemption.”

 

 

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Acclaimed Japanese Auteur makes Hollywood film usually results in disappointment, must be the system as very few non-English directors seem capable of breaking the curse. I suppose Verhoeven managed it in spectacular style, but I can't think of many Japanese directors who have done.

 

The OP should have mentioned it was a Sion Sono joint, he's a legend!

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On 14/08/2021 at 21:28, mushashi said:

Acclaimed Japanese Auteur makes Hollywood film usually results in disappointment, must be the system as very few non-English directors seem capable of breaking the curse. I suppose Verhoeven managed it in spectacular style, but I can't think of many Japanese directors who have done.

 

Ang Lee? Bong Joon-ho? (I didnt like Snowpiercer but Okja was well received, I've still not seen it). Was John Woo a disappointment even though Face/Off was great? Park Chan-wook? (I thought Stoker was decent). I thought The Last Stand was terrible so it's only Kim Jee-woon I've been disappointed in. (And though i think the direction of his 2 films after that is at times incredible, i don't think he holds quite the same status for people now given the run he was on). Wong Kar-wai? I haven't seen My Bluberry Nights. Actually i forget it exists. It's a film in line with his style so perhaps not a disappointment if it's what you expect. Who has been a disappointment? I don’t really expect any director to top their earlier classics, nevermind working outside their native country in a different language. 

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On 16/08/2021 at 15:43, Loik V credern said:

 

Ang Lee? Bong Joon-ho? (I didnt like Snowpiercer but Okja was well received, I've still not seen it). Was John Woo a disappointment even though Face/Off was great? Park Chan-wook? (I thought Stoker was decent). I thought The Last Stand was terrible so it's only Kim Jee-woon I've been disappointed in. (And though i think the direction of his 2 films after that is at times incredible, i don't think he holds quite the same status for people now given the run he was on). Wong Kar-wai? I haven't seen My Bluberry Nights. Actually i forget it exists. It's a film in line with his style so perhaps not a disappointment if it's what you expect. Who has been a disappointment? I don’t really expect any director to top their earlier classics, nevermind working outside their native country in a different language. 

 

John Woo's Hollywood efforts a disappoint?, yes I'd say so. Face/Off was pretty good, but overall better than his Chow Yun-fat HK collabs? not personally. (but that might be in part because Chow Yun-fat is a charismatic SOB 😍)

 

When I wrote that, I was thinking of people like Takeshi Kitano, Ilya Naishuller, Mathieu Kassovitz, José Padilha and even Neill Blomkamp would qualify (whose low budget SA originals I enjoyed more than his big budget star powered Hollywood effort)

 

A Google brought up this list, some all-time heavy hitters have belly flopped in Hollywood:

 

https://cassavafilms.com/list-of-9/nine-great-foreign-directors-whose-english-language-films-flopped

 

It just seems failure is more common than success for acclaimed foreign directors.

 

The Mexicans have managed to break through with the Three Amigos of Cinema all having multiple great successful English-language films.

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On 21/08/2021 at 19:14, mushashi said:

John Woo's Hollywood efforts a disappoint?, yes I'd say so. Face/Off was pretty good, but overall better than his Chow Yun-fat HK collabs? not personally. (but that might be in part because Chow Yun-fat is a charismatic SOB 😍)

 

In all John Woo's Hollywood films are disappointing but i just think that word supposes a director will come close to their earlier work and they won't, few do. The authenticity, raw energy, bold ideas, risk taking, desire to prove themselves, the freedom...they lose all that. But yeah you look at Hard Target and Broken Arrow coming after Hard Boiled and think; well you excel in brutal stripped back close quarters gun shoot outs and those films have none of that. Face/Off uses his slow mo well though and i think it's aged well. 

 

It's not like I'm old enough to have seen John Woo's 80s films though at the time and then watch his 90s Hollywood films and get initially excited then disappointed. I just grew up on his 90s films then watched some earlier ones. 

 

On 21/08/2021 at 19:14, mushashi said:

When I wrote that, I was thinking of people like Takeshi Kitano, Ilya Naishuller, Mathieu Kassovitz, José Padilha and even Neill Blomkamp would qualify (whose low budget SA originals I enjoyed more than his big budget star powered Hollywood effort)

 

A Google brought up this list, some all-time heavy hitters have belly flopped in Hollywood:

 

https://cassavafilms.com/list-of-9/nine-great-foreign-directors-whose-english-language-films-flopped

 

It just seems failure is more common than success for acclaimed foreign directors.

 

The Mexicans have managed to break through with the Three Amigos of Cinema all having multiple great successful English-language films.

 

I didn't know Kitano did an American film. Is it just Brother? Ilya Naishuller...because Hardcore Henry was disappointing based on his few earlier shorts? Nobody was disappointing based on...? Mathieu Kassovitz...god knows what happened to his career. José Padilha...i don't think he had a chance on Robocop with everything that's come out. 

 

One of the big recent disappointments for people would be Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck with The Tourist but again i didn't watch The Lives Of Others at the time of its release and if i did i wouldn't be excited he's working with Jonny Depp and Angelina Jolie because i don't think they chood good material anymore. 

 

Fernando Meirelles is maybe a disappointment for people after City Of God but again like so many directors who use the environment they know when their films take place elsewhere they lose their power and appeal and just become ordinary films like anything else. 

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14 minutes ago, iknowgungfu said:

Guillermo Del Toro does alright?


Well he does now, but don’t forget his first American film Mimic was a big flop. He had to go away from the Hollywood system to make the award winning The Devil’s Backbone and before they gave him another shot. It was only the one-two punch of Hellboy and Pan’s Labyrinth that made him viable for mainstream films again. 

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  • 4 weeks later...
15 minutes ago, max renn said:

Fab thanks Bazjam🙂

 

There's scant info but is it getting a theatrical release in UK? 

The Guardian review say it is, but I can't see it on any listings so think they may have that wrong.

Shame, would love to see a Sion Sono film on the big screen.

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It's on all the usual streaming sites already.

 

A couple of the cinemas in London have it showing.

 

I saw Tokyo Tribe in Peterborough, and it was great to see on the big screen. 

 

Can't wait for other people here to see it as there is so much to talk about with this one lol 

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That was...What was that!?!

 

Its like, part low budget 80's style post apoc movie, mixed with an asian martial arts film of the same era, cowboys for some reason, and nic cage being, well, nic cage!?! :blink: And some genuinely brilliant cinematography!?

 

I wasn't quite sure what i expected, but bizarrely, it was exactly what i expected!

 

absolute B movie/cult movie out of 10!

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It’s definitely disjointed in parts, but I enjoyed the hell out of it. As always with Sono’s films some of the imagery is fantastic. Laugh out loud funny in parts as well (the way Cage shouts “TESTICLE” a particular fave).

 

Apparently Cage is going to make more films with Sion Sono, and I’m definitely down with that.

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I haven’t seen it yet but it seems barely one step up from all that intentionally shit ‘Sharknado’ jank. The vast majority of cult films are memorable because of their genuine creative integrity; nearly always someone who thought they were making a masterpiece with fascinating results. It’s no fun when everyone involved is trying their hardest to be purposefully wacky, instead it reeks of cynical smugness. 

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19 minutes ago, CarloOos said:

I haven’t seen it yet but it seems barely one step up from all that intentionally shit ‘Sharknado’ jank. The vast majority of cult films are memorable because of their genuine creative integrity; nearly always someone who thought they were making a masterpiece with fascinating results. It’s no fun when everyone involved is trying their hardest to be purposefully wacky, instead it reeks of cynical smugness. 

I can understand how it may look that way, but Sion Sono is the very definition of a cult film maker. This film misses as much as it hits, but there is definitely an artistic intention to it. There’s a large dollop of tongue in cheek and absurdity (as there are in many on Sono’s films) but it’s by no means cynically done. They don’t quite hit the landing here, but both star and director are big fans of each other and want to do good work together. When Sono hits, his films are incredible, and Cage could be a great fit into his cannon.

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On 20/09/2021 at 21:15, Bazjam said:

I can understand how it may look that way, but Sion Sono is the very definition of a cult film maker. This film misses as much as it hits, but there is definitely an artistic intention to it. There’s a large dollop of tongue in cheek and absurdity (as there are in many on Sono’s films) but it’s by no means cynically done. They don’t quite hit the landing here, but both star and director are big fans of each other and want to do good work together. When Sono hits, his films are incredible, and Cage could be a great fit into his cannon.

To be fired into his next movie?

 

 

 

 

 

 

That was a cheap shot, sorry.

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