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Games that had you at "hello".


dumpster
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I've just played Metroid Dread.  It's been about 15 minutes.  I know, with pretty much certainty that I'm going to be playing this a lot.  It just feels perfect. The movement of the character, responsiveness, the control scheme, it just got me straight away.  As soon as I got through the first screen I knew this is quite something. 

 

Comparing with another favourite of mine, Deadly Premonition, a game that starts off bad and gets worse until you suddenly realise it's completely brilliant.  

 

So, what games did you know from the first 10 minutes would be an all time favourite? 

 

And which games started off rubbish but you stuck with it and ended up fantastic?

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38 minutes ago, dumpster said:

So, what games did you know from the first 10 minutes would be an all time favourite? 

 

I've been on a diet of slow-burn RPGs lately so this one's actually pretty hard to answer. I guess... anything that starts with a concise preview of the kind of madness you should expect in the whole game. So, Ghost Trick's opening junkyard chapter, or Half-Minute Hero's premise being easy to understand and quickly-established in the first quest.

 

38 minutes ago, dumpster said:

And which games started off rubbish but you stuck with it and ended up fantastic?

 

The aforementioned slow-burn RPGs. 🙃 Most recently my initial Chrono Trigger playthrough this year and my initial FFVI playthrough last year. "Rubbish" might be harsh, but coming to those games with a 2020s mindset was a pretty rough acclimation process. I also think that Persona 2 IS on PSP holds up pretty well out of all of the P1 and P2 games. (Although the writing/story may have its weird moments...)

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a) Valkyria Chronicles. I'm only a fairweather RPG fan and all previous attempts at SRPGs (FFTA, Xcom, Fire Emblem etc) absolutely frazzled my brain, and I tended to give up very quickly despite my best intentions. VC looked amazing, had a silly alternate-WW2 story like Ring of Red which I enjoyed, and had a perfectly judged difficulty curve (apart from THAT level). Absolutely adored it from the first minute.

 

b) Yakuza 3. My first in the series, back in 2010 the concept of playing a subtitled game was a hard sell to me. Then you have reams of cutscenes to watch before the game kicks off proper, and for fear of missing out I also watched the incomprehensible catch up videos before I started. Finally for the first 10 hours or so you are pottering around a pokey little seaside orphanage, it's a tough introduction. In hindsight now having played all of them, it's by far the slowest start but it also has an odd serene charm to it. Brilliant stuff.

 

 

 

 

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Destiny. Played the Beta and from picking up the first gun and shooting the Dregs I was in. I don’t really play online so all I ever did in the end was the story missions alone and some strikes with randoms but boy that game feels good to play. 

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I've had just this recently with Disco Elysium. From the first scene and especially with the mirror scene, I just knew this was going to be an all-time great.

 

Playing Morrowind for the first time, not really knowing what to expect. Taking in all the systems in the first house, then stepping out and "you're on your own now, good luck"

 

Thief 2: walking up to the house, sneaking inside and firing the fist water arrow and hearing the guard's reaction - sold.

 

Mario 64 - Mario jumps out and I start walking by tilting the analogue stick. Mind blown.

 

 

 

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For me the above picture acheives the opposite.

 

Anyway, most recently: the digital version of the Gloomhaven board game. It's an almost perfect adaptation. The precise and exacting tactical brilliance of it is condensed into a slick interface and quicker to set up and actually play multiplayer. And it streamlines any parts of the actual physical game that make it less easy to get into because of its sheer size. (Apart from the difficulty, which is still intact, but part of why it's great.)

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The original Skate. 
 

As a skateboarder in the 80s and early 90s, I was never keen on the silly over the top nature of the Tony Hawk games. The much more realistic nature of Skate was my dream come true. Needless to say the Skate series itself has gotten a bit less realistic as time as gone by. Let’s hope the upcoming game goes back to its roots. 

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1 hour ago, Wiper said:

 

Osu! Tatakae! Ouendan

The perfect rhythm-action game starts as it means to go on. Glorious cut-scenes, glorious music, glorious patterns to follow. Instantly hooked.

 

Yes x 1000. Ouendan just grabbed me from the get go. Loved the ghost bit.  I was so disappointed with the sequel.

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As has previously been mentioned BotW. I'd add to that The Witness, which is not only wonderful from the opening moments but just managed to amaze me with the shear ingeunity and genius all the way through.

 

Rez Infinite however is probably the defining one for me, not only is it amazing from the moment it starts but it also totally sold me on VR instantly.

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World of Warcraft. Making a gnome, the smallest race in the game, and running from the starting zone to the next zone with no loading screens and it was just so massive! It has a sense of scale I’ve never experienced before or since. I’m still playing it almost 17 years later and I still love it, even if Activision Blizzard seem intent on making it harder and harder for me to do so. 

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Zelda games have been a mixture of both. The efficient start of A Link to the Past was apparently forgotten for years as they got increasingly bloated at the front end with character and story building, before Breath of the Wild got it right again.

 

The worst offender though is Okami. The whole first act of about a dozen hours is pretty tedious, but once you start to journey across its world it's magnificent.

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28 minutes ago, BadgerFarmer said:

Zelda games have been a mixture of both. The efficient start of A Link to the Past was apparently forgotten for years as they got increasingly bloated at the front end with character and story building, before Breath of the Wild got it right again.

 

The worst offender though is Okami. The whole first act of about a dozen hours is pretty tedious, but once you start to journey across its world it's magnificent.

 

Okami remains one of the most egregious examples of not reading the room in gaming history as far as I'm concerned. The intro sequence was bafflingly long as it was, but adding the incessant chirping 'speech' for the text was enough for me to immediately stop and never touch the thing again. 

 

 

 

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Zelda LLTP. The opening scene, the rain on the roof. The music. Being told not to get out of bed.

Not touching the controller for a minute because I'd been told not to get out of bed...

Finally relenting and wandering into the rain...

So atmospheric. It had me already.

 

Mario 64. Even before playing it, that Gamesmaster piece. I needed it at that point.

So I imported an N64 from Japan for it. And invited a friend round.

The cutscene played, Mario popped out of the tunnel. My friend sat there, thinking it was still the cutscene. I said "Go on" and he tilted the N64 joystick.

"Wow." He said as Mario hared around. "Wow" he repeated again. He couldn't believe it. That was his moment for sure.

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The introductory set of microgames from Wario Ware Inc. on GBA. At the time I hadn’t played anything like Bishi Bashi, and my first real exposure to Wario Ware Inc. was the Edge review. Even after reading that, I still wasn’t entirely sure what to expect… but those 10 or so games you play in the boom box instantly sold the concept.

 

And by extension, Rhythm Tengoku on GBA, and - more recently - Rhythm Doctor this year. The former adds a rhythm twist to a bunch of diverse challenges, whilst RD is laser-focused on one idea which it then goes nuts with over the course of the game.

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