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Games that had you at "hello".


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I think I'm instantly drawn to things where the controller feels alive in your hands and somehow magic is conveyed between what you are doing on screen and the inputs you're providing, it's not even about being good immediately, sometimes a game can feel brilliant but you're shite at it, but it's conveyed something very quickly to you where you know the issue is a skill thing.

 

Most recently Circuit Superstars did this, its an isometric racer with a far deeper handling model than you'd expect and it just plays brilliantly, it's a far better handling model than most of the big 3d racers I've played in recent years.

 

Similarly things like Wave Race 64, Mario 64, Unirally, Splatoon all convey something that most games don't the second you start moving on the screen. 

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58 minutes ago, Qazimod said:

The introductory set of microgames from Wario Ware Inc. on GBA. At the time I hadn’t played anything like Bishi Bashi, and my first real exposure to Wario Ware Inc. was the Edge review. Even after reading that, I still wasn’t entirely sure what to expect… but those 10 or so games you play in the boom box instantly sold the concept.


This is a good one. I mean, even looking back at the synopsis of the game now, it sounds ridiculous. But those first few stages just grab you and communicate exactly what the game is about, crazy humour and all.

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9 hours ago, Benny said:

Anyway, most recently: the digital version of the Gloomhaven board game. It's an almost perfect adaptation. The precise and exacting tactical brilliance of it is condensed into a slick interface and quicker to set up and actually play multiplayer. And it streamlines any parts of the actual physical game that make it less easy to get into because of its sheer size. (Apart from the difficulty, which is still intact, but part of why it's great.)


Really? I played a pre-release beta and it was a bit shit. This is good to hear, because I want the game but don’t have anyone to play or even appreciate it sitting on a shelf with.

 

The digital version of Scythe is also great. You can just slap it on your screen and raggedly pick up the rules and mechanics over two or three games. I could get the physical version anytime and jump right in to it.

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Love games that are quick and accessible whilst dazzling me with visuals that only the medium can provide! So Nex Machina, Resogun, Rez etc.

 

Tetris and more lately Tetris effect again quick but addictive time wasters that offer instant feedback.

 

Love a good linear story game too. Loved the Uncharted series, Last Of Us and more recently God Of War. The stories and the intros have me in the first 10-15 minutes.

 

God Of War is one I recently started and the first hour on that is outstanding. Lovely mix of scene setting and action and continues to drip feed story and action all the way though in perfect doses for me. Great way of combining a game and story IMHO.

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Older game here, but… Secret of Mana. You get an intro with storyline, yes, but it’s short, raises a sense of mystery, and has great ominous music. Then you’re away, swinging your sword, straight into the action. (Added advantage of the cartridge format, all of the backdrops you see in passing in the intro sequence you later visit in-game.)  

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4 minutes ago, CovisGod said:

Final Fantasy 7, the opening cut scene and music still gives me goosebumps to this day


FFVII was the first RPG I ever played. Genuinely didn’t think I liked them before I played that, and it grabbed me instantly. It was super exciting, and taught me the basics of turn-based combat (and with the scorpion boss taught me you don’t necessarily attack on every turn). It has a lot of ground to cover in that first section, but it’s very short and doesn’t outstay its welcome even on subsequent plays. Genius game design.

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54 minutes ago, Paulando said:


FFVII was the first RPG I ever played. Genuinely didn’t think I liked them before I played that, and it grabbed me instantly. It was super exciting, and taught me the basics of turn-based combat (and with the scorpion boss taught me you don’t necessarily attack on every turn). It has a lot of ground to cover in that first section, but it’s very short and doesn’t outstay its welcome even on subsequent plays. Genius game design.

The groundwork for that was laid by Final Fantasy VI (or Final Fantasy III, as it was know then) – you get a ‘cinematic’ opening without a story infodump, and you’re directly into controlling Terra/Tina and a couple of redshirts in order to show you the ropes about how the turn-based battles in an unofficial tutorial. The game’s story and mysteries also unfold over time, in a similar style to FF VII.

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Skies of Arcadia. The demo for that was the first few hours of the game and not only do you start with a fantastic intro that quickly introduces the characters but also the idea of being sky pirates who are in this jrpg world for fun rather than dead family, ultimate curse, mystical sword etc but you get a quick intro battle taking down a ship before being shown a fun world and then just going on an adventure for a meteorite that landed in the distance. It just has so much fun coming out from every aspect and makes you feel like you’re apart of a fun adventure than the typical RPG.

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I was dabbling with Super Metroid yesterday and thinking of starting a thread exactly like this.

 

The opening - with the synthesised speech, that music kicking in, then the space station, Ridley fading in from the background, the escape, driving rain in Crateria, the spotlights and heads following you until the planet comes alive is amazing. In the mid 1990s it was genuinely mind-blowing. It's like the team saw the opening of LTTP and just had to one up it.

 

And incredibly efficient to boot. Even Nintendo would shove a dozen tutorials in there now.

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Another World.

 

As soon as I saw the review of it in ACE, I knew it was going to be amazing, and after I played it on my mate’s Amiga, I wasn’t disappointed. 
 

It’s still a genuinely great game, and the visuals are still perfect. 
 

The little black slugs can fuck right off though…until I got the SNES version, which was far far easier than the original!

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People are just naming specific games, the OP was asking more about general mechanics or systems that turn you off from playing further.

 

Things that will immediately lose me -

 

Starting the game with all of my gear levelled like a killing machine, then getting it all taken away and beginning the painful process of levelling up. I hate that. For once just let me enjoy being overpowered and find other ways to challenge me. That crappy shark game did it recently. Delete.

 

This is rare but any game asking me to create an an additional account and sign up on top of my PSN or Xbox account. Those fucking things always end up getting compromised.

 

Any game with slow walking/dialogue where I'm just pushing forward and listening to some crappy story. No time for it. Bin.

 

 

 

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Dishonored - one look at the world/lore and that was it

 

Galaga - the sounds, the turning upside down of the aliens

 

Pac Man Championship Edition - neon delight (still maintain CE2 was a big disappointment)

 

Marble Madness - the surrealism

 

 

 

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Super Mario 35, of all things. I am very much not a fan of online multiplayer (a bit of overwatch on rate occasions, and that's it) but having liked the concept of Tetris 99 I was really on board for this, especially considering I'm over 30 and so have a feel and understanding for the physics and mechanics of SMB that border on mastery of the Force, something the Fortnite generation would never understand. ;)

 

It totally lived up to it. It played perfectly, and I dunno what the matchmaking was programmed like but it was always excitingly close.

 

Then of course Nintendo got rid of it because they're fucking demented.

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I still find the opening section of Last of Us one of the most affecting things I’ve had thrust upon me in terms of visual/audio clout. I was just replaying it earlier on, and even after a number of times playing through those initial moments, it still feels like an absolute gut punch. Definitely a real gaming moment for me, and one that propelled me to get through the game (as difficult as it can be). 
 

The sequel could never hit those same notes, and whilst it’s good (and visually awesome of course), it’s so unremittingly bleak. 
 

Doesn’t help that I kind of hated everyone in it too!

 

But that might have been the point.

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Most recently Returnal. Not only is the intro very well done with some killer music, but it's one of those games that immediately feels good when you pick up the controller. And I'm not talking about the haptics, even though those are great as well. Just spending some time running around the crash location of your ship, (air) dashing and shooting your pistol is a joy in itself. Very atmospheric too. Masterpiece. I know The Guardian made the comparison to controlling Mario in their Returnal review and 64 gave me a similar feeling, just running around in the courtyard, (triple) jumping, climbing trees and swimming. Games where controlling your character is an utter joy in itself are the best.

Also, Cuphead. Everything about it. The music, the art, the controls. It had me at the absolutely wonderful title screen and didn't let go until I I completed the thing.

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Katana Zero. It starts with a a slow-mo deflection of a bullet with a blade and then just sprints with that concept with increasing intensity. Plus the whole vibe feels like you're playing a game you're too young for on your big cousin's Amiga. If anything I was even more in love with it by the end than I was at the start, absolute Top 10 contender.

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16 hours ago, JoeK said:

 

Doesn’t help that I kind of hated everyone in it too!

 

 

even Dana and the baby and the doggos? for shame

 

Skate is a good one, pretty much from the first ollie and definitely from the first grind it was obviously the new King of Skateboarding. I went in late to work the day the demo came out.

Some games have mechanics that feel so fucking good, the first time you nail a gun-parry in Bloodborne or break someone's guard in Sekiro. Or unleash complete hell in Bangai-0

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A lot of the games I love take a bit of time to get into, but I don't mind that - I enjoy the initial setup, hand holding, story introductions etc (I am clearly in a minority after reading the other thread :lol:).  Stuff like Assassins Creed Odyssey, RDR 2, Witcher 3, Skyrim - all take a bit of time to sink in before I know if I'm going to be sucked in or not.

 

But anyway, in terms of immediate positive reaction, my choice here would be Streets of Rage 4.

 

"Please be good - please feel like SoR - please give me that retro goodness as well as playing like a dream....... OH YES!"

 

They nailed it and I realised I was going to love it within 30 seconds of the first level. 

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