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Stunt Car Racer for SuperCPU (C64) at 50 fps


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It's a CPU accelerator.

 

https://www.c64-wiki.com/wiki/SuperCPU

 

Quote

he SuperCPU was released in 1996 by Creative Micro Designs. It is perhaps the best known CPU accelerators for the Commodore 64 and Commodore 128. It was certainly the most compatible accelerator of its day. It distinguished itself in both speed and compatibility.

The first release of the SuperCPU (v1) was buggy and was not fully optimized. This was due to the fact that the first Altera CPLD used by CMD was too small to include all of the necessary optimization logic to ensure a high degree of compatibility.

The second release of the SuperCPU (v2) generally solved these problems. It included a higher capacity Altera CPLD which allowed for more highly optimized logic without exceeding the capabilities of the chip.

 

 

300px-SuperCPU.jpg

 

Ups the clock speed to 20 MHz.

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I recall reading about the SuperCPU through newsgroups and mailing lists when I first got on the net in 1997. Most suppliers seemed to be in the North America market; I can't recall anyone selling it in the UK at the time (though may have forgotten).

 

I got the impression it was primarily aimed at C64 enthusiasts and small businesses* that wanted a speed boost for their C64 productivity software (*The type of business with only a few employees that had bought a computer to perform a single task in the 1980s and couldn't afford to switch to another platform). A lot of the discussion on Commodore newsgroups/mailing lists that I recall seemed to focus upon speed improvements to existing applications and SCPU-enhanced drivers for GEOS, the GUI-driven operating system.

 

The VICE emulator has SuperCPU support if you want to see it in action.

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5 hours ago, Dudley said:

I assume he's long, long retired. Or possibly dead.  His career kinda died with assembler and fps fixed game engines.  I don't think he's had a large part in any release anything since 2002.

He was interviewed by @Duddyroar in Retro Gamer back in 2009, but I don’t think he’s spoken to anyone since.

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19 minutes ago, knightbeat said:

 

I recall reading about the SuperCPU through newsgroups and mailing lists when I first got on the net in 1997. Most suppliers seemed to be in the North America market; I can't recall anyone selling it in the UK at the time (though may have forgotten).

 

I got the impression it was primarily aimed at C64 enthusiasts and small businesses* that wanted a speed boost for their C64 productivity software (*The type of business with only a few employees that had bought a computer to perform a single task in the 1980s and couldn't afford to switch to another platform). A lot of the discussion on Commodore newsgroups/mailing lists that I recall seemed to focus upon speed improvements to existing applications and SCPU-enhanced drivers for GEOS, the GUI-driven operating system.

 

The VICE emulator has SuperCPU support if you want to see it in action.

Interesting! Thanks

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Lost Toys (who did Battle Engine Aquila) were working on a Stunt Car Racer remake in around 2003:

 

 

It looked alright, without looking incredible. A remake of SCR would have to be pretty spectacular to live up to the impact of the original. 

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It's a weird one, Mr Crammond has pretty much gone the way of Ian Bell. Given the brightness of their stars, it always seems so incongruous from the outside. Still, every individual leads their own life and what an output Crammond had. Truly a British software legend. I'd hate to see Stunt Car make any sort of come back without him solely in charge. Unfortunately, I somehow doubt he retains the ip, so I'm bracing myself for the inevitable mobile/indie/PS5/we zoomed with Geoff for half an hour remake cashin sometime soon.

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23 hours ago, K said:

Lost Toys (who did Battle Engine Aquila) were working on a Stunt Car Racer remake in around 2003:

 

 

It looked alright, without looking incredible. A remake of SCR would have to be pretty spectacular to live up to the impact of the original. 

 

I can't believe you found footage! I've spent ages trawling the web for any information about the sequel (albeit about 8 years ago). Now that I see it, it does seem a tad disappointing...

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3 minutes ago, Tomdominer said:

 

I can't believe you found footage! I've spent ages trawling the web for any information about the sequel (albeit about 8 years ago). Now that I see it, it does seem a tad disappointing...

 

The link was from this book:

 

https://www.bitmapbooks.co.uk/products/the-games-that-werent

 

It's worth it if you're interested in lost / forgotten / unreleased games, although its not that well written and (for me anyway) it spends a LOT of time talking about ephemera like the unreleased Master System port of Lethal Weapon, which I struggle to believe anyone will be that interested in. Of course, if you're dying to find out what happened to the Master System version of Lethal Weapon, then ignore all of that as it's potentially the greatest book ever written.

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4 hours ago, gizmo1990 said:

It's a weird one, Mr Crammond has pretty much gone the way of Ian Bell. Given the brightness of their stars, it always seems so incongruous from the outside. 

 

Except, as far as I know, for the bit where Ian Bell went full Linehan.

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On 12/12/2021 at 18:26, K said:

Lost Toys (who did Battle Engine Aquila) were working on a Stunt Car Racer remake in around 2003:

 

 

It looked alright, without looking incredible. A remake of SCR would have to be pretty spectacular to live up to the impact of the original. 


how old is track mania?

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54 minutes ago, Dudley said:

 

Except, as far as I know, for the bit where Ian Bell went full Linehan.

 

Are you talking about odd political or social views? If so, I've not heard that at all? From what I've known about his views and interests they revolve around more hippy / clubbing lifestyle culture. And cats. Afaik he's been dark for the past 20 years at least. As in not courted the limelight. And prior to that he'd not been associated with the games industry for a good 10 years too.

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On 12/12/2021 at 17:05, Protocol Penguin said:

He was interviewed by @Duddyroar in Retro Gamer back in 2009, but I don’t think he’s spoken to anyone since.

I read somewhere (need to check where) that he licensed the F1 engine and got paid a few million back when that was a lot of money. 

 

Will check where I read it and come back.

 

EDIT: looked and looked but cant find the piece. Drat.

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1 hour ago, Dudley said:

I blocked him for a massively transphobic tweet, replying to the world's most famous transphobe not called Graham.

 

Sorry I know we're getting OT here, but Ian Bell is on twitter??? AFAIK this site is the only net footprint of the guy and has been for many many years? Are you talking about a different Ian Bell??

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16 hours ago, K said:

The link was from this book:

 

https://www.bitmapbooks.co.uk/products/the-games-that-werent

 

It's worth it if you're interested in lost / forgotten / unreleased games, although its not that well written and (for me anyway) it spends a LOT of time talking about ephemera like the unreleased Master System port of Lethal Weapon, which I struggle to believe anyone will be that interested in. Of course, if you're dying to find out what happened to the Master System version of Lethal Weapon, then ignore all of that as it's potentially the greatest book ever written.

 

I'd like it for the pictures! Also "Space Fantasy Zone"!?

 

EDIT:

 

 

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I think Ian Bell ended up working at Autodesk. Some starry-eyed Elite fan who also worked at Autodesk managed to get him to agree to an interview a few years back, and the resulting piece was an absolute masterclass in grumpy non-answers from someone who was sick to the back teeth of talking about Elite. He sounded quite bitter; I understand that he and David Braben fell out spectacularly over some seemingly minor issue around Braben's use of some algorithm Ian Bell have come up with during the development of Elite II, and now refuse to even be in the same room together. I got the sense that he let his Elite money dwindle away without much to show for it, and wasn't that happy about it. It probably doesn't help that Braben is likely pretty wealthy, and is a prominent developer and tech person.

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36 minutes ago, ianinthefuture said:

He was on Twitter, his account is suspended.

 

Yeah I can't guarantee it was him but it absolutely wasn't the former Slightly Mad Studios head (he's just generally a bit of a dick but not a problematic one) and it WAS verified and claimed to be him in the bio.

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16 hours ago, K said:

its not that well written

Genuinely my main takeaway from the book. An interesting curio and one where you can coo at the projects you didn't know existed til you saw them in there, but the writing is... wayward. Lost my interest very quickly.

 

Anyway, the topic: this has ruined the original Stunt Car Racer for me. I can never go back to racing at 3 seconds per frame.

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Just now, ianinthefuture said:

Genuinely my main takeaway from the book. An interesting curio and one where you can coo at the projects you didn't know existed til you saw them in there, but the writing is... wayward. Lost my interest very quickly.

 

Anyway, the topic: this has ruined the original Stunt Car Racer for me. I can never go back to racing at 3 seconds per frame.

 

Yes, exactly. I can't fault the guy's enthusiasm, but he has some weird tics, like detailing all of the people who worked on a game who couldn't or wouldn't talk to him. In pretty much every article.

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52 minutes ago, K said:

I think Ian Bell ended up working at Autodesk. Some starry-eyed Elite fan who also worked at Autodesk managed to get him to agree to an interview a few years back, and the resulting piece was an absolute masterclass in grumpy non-answers from someone who was sick to the back teeth of talking about Elite. He sounded quite bitter; I understand that he and David Braben fell out spectacularly over some seemingly minor issue around Braben's use of some algorithm Ian Bell have come up with during the development of Elite II, and now refuse to even be in the same room together. I got the sense that he let his Elite money dwindle away without much to show for it, and wasn't that happy about it. It probably doesn't help that Braben is likely pretty wealthy, and is a prominent developer and tech person.

 

Are you talking about this interview? If so, I think it's a bit disingenuous to describe it the way you have. Tbh imo he just comes off as very much a certain type of programmer, personality wise, one being email interviewed by an unknown colleague likely in another country. There's long been industry scuttlebutt around the background to the fallout between Bell and Braben. But as to the right or wrong of whatever party, it's all just hearsay still, as far as I know at least.

 

Regarding the twitter stuff, I can't find anything about it other than the shortened google link exerts to suspended accounts, with him tweeting a reply to someone leaving the Labour Party? It does indeed look like it is 'Elite' Ian Bell given in the bio text though. Just that blows my mind, as he's a person who you'd nail down as never being on twitter. He must have just joined in the last few years then surely? It's a shame I can't find out more on this, as transphobic stuff would go against pretty much everything I'd known about his character previously.

 

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6 minutes ago, gizmo1990 said:

 

Are you talking about this interview? If so, I think it's a bit disingenuous to describe it the way you have. Tbh imo he just comes off as very much a certain type of programmer, personality wise, one being email interviewed by an unknown colleague like in another country. There's long been industry scuttlebutt around the background to the fallout between Bell and Braben. But as to the right or wrong of whatever party, it's all just hearsay still, as far as I know at least.

 

Regarding the twitter stuff, I can't find anything about it other than the google link exerts to suspended accounts, with him tweeting a reply to someone leaving the Labour Party? It does indeed look like it is 'Elite' Ian Bell given in the bio text though. Just that blows my mind, as he's a person who you'd nail down as never being on twitter. He must have just joined in the last few years then surely? It's a shame I can't find out more on this, as transphobic stuff would go against pretty much everything I'd known about his character previously.

 

 

I don't think I'm being disingenuous. I might have hyped it up a bit, but he doesn't exactly come across as someone who's delighted to be talking about Elite. Ian Bell gives his reasons for falling out with David Braben here:

 

http://www.elitehomepage.org/archive/b5081501.htm

 

I'm sure there's more to it than that. Those reasons sound more like symptoms of a relationship breaking down, rather than the cause.

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