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Yorkshire Puddings - Help


Capwn
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Trying to make yorkshire pudding for the first time. Often hear 'main thing is that it's smoking hot etc etc' so will try that. Am going to follow this one first though during my research, this seems to be the only one that doesn't use milk. Milk for yorkshire puddings, yay or nay? My other half can't have milk, so would have to substitute it for almond milk. Also got no lard/fat, wanting to avoid that if possible. So am using canola oil. 

 

 

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Attempt 1 : hmmm. This was 1 table spoon canola oil per pudding. Mix was plain flour, 3 eggs and a splash of almond milk. Oven at 425, tray in with oil for 10 mins. Add batter. 20 mins, turn over 5 mins.

 

they did sort of fluff up but some were stuck to the tin, I should have brushed with the oil.

 

not very crispy, edible but quite spongey 

B58BAEF3-75B2-4A27-9526-3D9C22F55930.jpeg

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A splash of milk? Whose recipe are you using? You should be able to substitute any kind milk and get fairly good results, but it sounds like you don't have enough liquid in your mix.

 

If you want tall, crispy puds, you want a thinner batter. I've been using the batter from Jamie Oliver's toad in the hole recipe and pouring it into a preheated muffin tray with about a tbsp of oil in each divot. Oven as hot as it will go, leave them alone for 15 minutes before checking on them and hey presto you've got puds.

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4 hours ago, revlob said:

If you want tall, crispy puds, you want a thinner batter. I've been using the batter from Jamie Oliver's toad in the hole recipe and pouring it into a preheated muffin tray with about a tbsp of oil in each divot. 

 

Just checked it out, do you add wheat beer as well? Also another reason why I'm probably messing this up is that I don't follow these recipes as they are usually for 8 people. So typically quarter the measurements.

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My recipe is just equal parts egg, milk flour. I use a mug and crack in about three eggs and give them a stir. Make a note of where they come to on the mug, then measure the same level of flour and milk and mix it all together. Add salt and pepper.

 

If using a standard 12 cup(?) muffin tray, fill every other one so they can expand. Like so:

 

o x o x 

x o x o

o x o x

 

Bake in the oven at 200c for 20 mins, don't open the oven door.

 

Edited for spelling/clarity

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1 hour ago, RaoulSilva said:

My recipe is just equal parts egg, milk flour. use a mug and crack in about three eggs and give them a stir. Make a note of where the come to on the mug, then measure the same level of flour and milk. Add salt and pepper.

 

If using a standard 12 cup(?) muffin tray, fill every other one so they can expand. Like so:

 

o x o x 

x o x o

o x o x

 

Bake in the oven at 200c for 20 mins, don't in open the oven door.

 

 


This is pretty much my exact approach. That recipe is basically what I’d use for Yorkshire’s, pancakes, anything batter based really. Simple to remember and I always do it as you do: eggs first to give me my quantities.

 

Only thing I’d add (and assume you do) is that you should put oil into the tray and in the oven to get it really hot before adding the batter to cook.

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Oooh, dead thread but I do love a yorkshire pud.    I'm not far from Sean's recipe, but instead of doubling milk to flour I just use half as much again.   So 50g of flour is 75g of milk and an egg for every 100g of milk.    I've found the most important thing is just letting the batter sit for a while, preferably overnight in the fridge and then take it out to warm up a bit before you cook it but you want an absolute minimum of a couple of hours.   

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5 hours ago, Naysonymous said:

Oooh, dead thread but I do love a yorkshire pud.    I'm not far from Sean's recipe, but instead of doubling milk to flour I just use half as much again.   So 50g of flour is 75g of milk and an egg for every 100g of milk.    I've found the most important thing is just letting the batter sit for a while, preferably overnight in the fridge and then take it out to warm up a bit before you cook it but you want an absolute minimum of a couple of hours.   


+1 for letting it sit.

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On 03/01/2022 at 10:42, Naysonymous said:

Oooh, dead thread but I do love a yorkshire pud.    I'm not far from Sean's recipe, but instead of doubling milk to flour I just use half as much again.   So 50g of flour is 75g of milk and an egg for every 100g of milk.    I've found the most important thing is just letting the batter sit for a while, preferably overnight in the fridge and then take it out to warm up a bit before you cook it but you want an absolute minimum of a couple of hours.   

 

Bit confused here,

 

what's a good amount for say 6?

 

100g flour

150g milk

1.5 eggs?

 

That's according to your breakdown.

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I tend to go 200 flour, 300 milk, 3 eggs when I’m making them, but there are six people in my house and my son will probably take a couple to school with him too so they all get eaten, but most of the time I make Yorkshire pud it’s as part of a toad in the hole (it’s basically one enormous Yorkshire pud with sausages baked in if you are unfamiliar) 
 

 I might try making the ratio a bit more milky next time I cook some after reading that serious eats article referenced earlier in the thread.  

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On 04/01/2022 at 18:44, SeanR said:

That’ll do you twelve. You only need it a centimetre deep in the tray, cooking puffs it up.

 

If this makes 12;

 

100g flour

150g milk

1.5 eggs?

 

and I want to make 6 (ideally less really)

 

50g

75g milk

0.75 egg

 

Is 0.75 egg mad? or should I just add a full one? or will that mess things up?

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Make portions based on a whole egg and use as much batter as you need. Any left overs could make some little pancakes for pudding. Or a snack Yorkshire pudding tomorrow for lunch. Or just make a few extra for dinner.

 

And what is "an egg" anyway. Large? Medium? Even then they vary.

 

It is not an exact science for something like this. The hot oil and cooking approach matter much more than precisely weight ingredients.

 

Rough proportions will work (as you can see from this thread everyone does it slightly differently and has success).

 

 

 

 

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2nd attempt worse than 1st I think;

 

image.png.1e6f48e8b0a3e7e286ab939740b4e68e.png

 

50g flour

75g milk

2 eggs

 

Oven at 425 / 20mins

 

Mistakes I think I made; 

 

1) With 1 egg batter was white. When I see videos it's always yellow, so I put in another egg.

2) I think 425 isn't hot enough, getting nothing close to scorched surfaces. Tempted to try 450 next time.

3) forgot to wipe the tray dips with the oil again, some stuck to the tray.

4) Not sure about this but am using canola oil. I don't use lard. Perhaps should buy some vegetable oil next time.

 

 

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I think those look pretty close.

 

I suspect colour is influenced more by the quality/type of eggs than number. Some eggs have very yellow yolks. Others don't.

 

Slightly hotter oven.

 

Veg/sunflower oil will be better than canola (and both are better than lard in terms of smoke point).

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Attempt 3

 

Ok, getting somewhere now I think;

 

75g plain flour

75g almond milk

1 egg

 

Beat with a whisk, some people say kill the lumps, some say they are ok. I actually couldn't get rid of the lumps, I think it came down to me doing this in a mug instead of a bowl or measuring cup. So it was quite lumpy, left it in fridge for 3 hours.

 

Had oven at 450 this time (had it at 425 before) and put about a tablespoon of sunflower oil (first time in this experiment). After 15mins, I was expecting sizzling oil but it wasn't doing anything. I thought 'sod it' and put the oven to 500 and left it another 10mins. Still not sizzling, wtf. Anyway, put in the batter and left in there for 20min.

 

Visually, the color was the best yet but I don't think these are good puffed up puds? Can't really make out a hole like you could with my previous ones. As for the texture, best yet, I certainly got some of the crisp air stuff going on BUT in the lower middle it wasn't quite cooked and was almost soggy. 

 

What I think I need to do next time;

 

- Mix in bowl/jug as normal, really try to get rid of lumps

- 550 heat next time. This is kinda weird, most recipes I come across call for 425 at most.

- Fill up tray holes higher, I was going about 1/2 high instead of 3/4

- Remember to flip puds over and cook another 5mins, this was the first time I forgot to do that

 

image.png.cf806b4a8fb0783e9bd61e8f1feac6b4.png

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9 hours ago, Capwn said:

Attempt 3

 

Ok, getting somewhere now I think;

 

75g plain flour

75g almond milk

1 egg

 

Beat with a whisk, some people say kill the lumps, some say they are ok. I actually couldn't get rid of the lumps, I think it came down to me doing this in a mug instead of a bowl or measuring cup. So it was quite lumpy, left it in fridge for 3 hours.

 

Had oven at 450 this time (had it at 425 before) and put about a tablespoon of sunflower oil (first time in this experiment). After 15mins, I was expecting sizzling oil but it wasn't doing anything. I thought 'sod it' and put the oven to 500 and left it another 10mins. Still not sizzling, wtf. Anyway, put in the batter and left in there for 20min.

 

Visually, the color was the best yet but I don't think these are good puffed up puds? Can't really make out a hole like you could with my previous ones. As for the texture, best yet, I certainly got some of the crisp air stuff going on BUT in the lower middle it wasn't quite cooked and was almost soggy. 

 

What I think I need to do next time;

 

- Mix in bowl/jug as normal, really try to get rid of lumps

- 550 heat next time. This is kinda weird, most recipes I come across call for 425 at most.

- Fill up tray holes higher, I was going about 1/2 high instead of 3/4

- Remember to flip puds over and cook another 5mins, this was the first time I forgot to do that

 

image.png.cf806b4a8fb0783e9bd61e8f1feac6b4.png

 

I'm sure you don't want too many lumps. Clumps of flour aren't doing anything for the baking. So a few is not an issue but many is bad. I'd suggest an electric hand whisk as it makes very light work of it obviously.

 

I think hot as it goes it probably reasonable, but maybe actually turn it down after putting them in. so they get hit hot but don't burn too quickly before cooking through.

 

I suspect most ovens aren't even that accurate at temperature. Is it really 550? Hence above just "really fucking hot".

 

Sizzling... I suspect that sizzling is a result of impurities or something to sizzle around, something that actually causes the release of gas. A pure oil might not actually sizzle at all unless you drop something in it. This isn't like water where it's the breakdown of the water molecules into gas, producing bubbles.

 

I've never flipped a pud.

 

The other variable might be thinking about how much batter you put in each case. Maybe an experiment where you do each one with a different step amount and see how they vary.

 

In the same vein maybe don't use the middle holes of the pan and only the edge ones? Maybe those surrounded by others don't get heat the same way.

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Great ideas there, ok so refined plan...

 

- Mix however necessary for minimal bumps 

- 550 heat (not going to reduce it but if it burns then will start experimenting with reducing mid cook)

- Tray holes. Stick to outsides only for more breathing space. Have a plan going in with different batter depths for each hole

 

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I think theres too much flour in that mix. 

 

I don't make them often so I'm no expert but I try to follow Brian Turners* (I mean, if you are going Yorkshire you might as well go all the way) recipe/method. 

 

He uses equal parts, by volume, of egg, flour and a 50/50 mix of cold water and milk. So if you are using 5 tablespoons of liquid then you should be using five tablespoons of flour. A tablespoon of flour weighs less than 15g, closer to 10 or 11 based on converting old recipes, so you have 15-20g too much flour in that mix. 

And use a decent jug for mixing. Pyrex, none of that Anchor shite. 

 

 

*I've no idea if he is actually a horror, I liked him on Ready, Steady, Cook.

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Yeah am I getting confused, I recall someone saying "You're overthinking it, just use a mug with the same amounts. For example, half a mug of flour, half a mug of egg, half a mug of milk. Done.

 

I can't find that comment above yet I've not posted about yorkshire puddings anywhere else (promise), perhaps I'm going mad.

 

Ok, updated my plan.

 

- 50g flour, 75g milk, 1 egg

- Mix however necessary for minimal bumps 

- 550 heat (not going to reduce it but if it burns then will start experimenting with reducing mid cook)

- Tray holes. Stick to outsides only for more breathing space. Have a plan going in with different batter depths for each hole

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40 minutes ago, Capwn said:

Yeah am I getting confused, I recall someone saying "You're overthinking it, just use a mug with the same amounts. For example, half a mug of flour, half a mug of egg, half a mug of milk. Done.

 

I can't find that comment above yet I've not posted about yorkshire puddings anywhere else (promise), perhaps I'm going mad.

 

Ok, updated my plan.

 

- 50g flour, 75g milk, 1 egg

- Mix however necessary for minimal bumps 

- 550 heat (not going to reduce it but if it burns then will start experimenting with reducing mid cook)

- Tray holes. Stick to outsides only for more breathing space. Have a plan going in with different batter depths for each hole

 

It was RaoulSilva who said equal quantities by volume and I do the same.

 

so it's not "50g of flower/milk" it's "however much milk and however much flour matches the volume of egg I've used. So I crack my eggs into a measuring jug. Check how far up that came. Throw them in the bowl. Then pour in flour to the same depth. Add to bowl. Finally milk to the same line and into the bowl. All rough. The accuracy of this phase just doesn't matter. As per everyone using different recipes and claiming success.

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I split the milk with water which makes a lighter batter. That or beer. You definitely need to let that shit rest for a period too, that's absolutely vital. I reckon the fat makes a difference too – veg oil or whatever gets loads hotter so will make higher puddings, whereas dripping makes them taste incredible but a bit flatter. You can also heat the oil in the oven top whack and then pop it on the stove as you ladle your batter in so you don't lose heat. 

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