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Lost - The Full Series Thread


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So if Locke was made mortal once the cork of the island was removed and that was all part of the plan, then what possible harm could he do to anyone once he got off the island anyway? What happened to all that "everything you know and love will cease to exist" shit? And he didn't kill Jack (the final Candidate) just before he was about to leave in his boat, so if all of that wasn't neseccary why didn't he just leave when he wanted to?

I agree with Luke, that Smokey becoming mortal was a shock to him, and yes, letting him get off the island would have been fine. But they couldn't leave the bung out of the hole as I presume that was what was going to destroy the world if left unchecked. And as I said earlier, bung back in, Locke becomes smokey again, crazy chaos ensues off the island etc etc...

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I thought the stuff with Locke was brilliant, because he's a nobody with delusions of grandeur, somebody who's been a chump all his life and saw the island as a way to have a fresh start and become the wise badass he always wanted to be. When the Lostees started to discover some of the reason behind the island he clung like a maniac to the mystical dream. Eko shows up and he's more of mysterious, wise badass than Locke ever wanted to be, and when he's killed Locke pounces upon his discovery and tries to make it his own with all his "His death shall not be in vain, he left us a sign" rubbish, trying to be a leader again. Then we get the last episode and all his perceived techniques and smarts fall short, leading up to the destruction of the best source of information about the island the Lostees have so far found. More than that, Sayid is onto him.
I thought they were totally in keeping with everything we've seen of him in his flashbacks. Once he gets to the island and discovers he can walk and that his hunting skills are vital for survival he starts to think he's a lot smarter and more useful than he really is. When Boone was killed while following his actions he claimed the island demanded a sacrifice. When the hatch lit up while he was pretty much praying to it he took it as something divine when it was just Desmond turning on a light. In the last episode his reaction was "You didn't want me to beat that chess programme because there was a secret message at the end of it. Well I outsmarted you!". If anything they seem to be building up to him betraying the group, not because he's being manipulated but because his biggest secret is that he's the biggest chump there. Since the Others probably know this, like they know so much about the Lostees, all they need to do is say "You do what we tell you or we'll tell everyone you're not the hero they think you are" and Locke, as gullible and desperate as he is, is likely to do exactly what they want.

I'm slowly working my way through the entire thread at the moment. In the midst of season 3, Mr Burning here posted these two excellent posts in amongst a sea of moaning about how Locke's character had been neutered since season 1.

I say well done to Mr Burning who pre-empted the entire Locke story.

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I say well done to Mr Burning who pre-empted the entire Locke story.

Well, not quite the entire story.

I re-watched the whole of the first 5 series before this one started, and on re-watching really did think Locke was an idiot. He was so confident he was right about everything he was doing, and every single time he got it wrong.

I remember kind of liking him first time round.

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All 877 pages / 17533 posts of it? You are a brave turtle.

Tell me about it. Beats doing work during the day. Just read past the Paulo/Nicky episode which people seemed to like.

Amazingly, the beginning of season 3 is a real low point for loads of people. Lots of people hated the way the story had gone, called it the worst thing ever etc.

It's also fun reading people's crazy theories as well as the show went on and stuff was revealed.

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I was going to say Dave as well but I was never sure whether he was a figment of Hurley's imagination on the island like he was off it.

Libby's husband who died was called David, and she was in the asylum where Hurley was, and then on the island after Libby turned up. I like the idea that they laid all that down in season 2 knowing that Hurley would really be able to talk to dead people at some point.

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Here's another thing that I can't remember ever being explained:

All the time dilation stuff in season 4 - the payload that arrived 31 minutes late, the doctor washing up the shore before he was killed on the boat, the helicopter leaving the island and not showing up for a while on the boat... What was causing that? Was it ever explicitly explained or is just another "magic cave" moment?

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Here's another thing that I can't remember ever being explained:

All the time dilation stuff in season 4 - the payload that arrived 31 minutes late, the doctor washing up the shore before he was killed on the boat, the helicopter leaving the island and not showing up for a while on the boat... What was causing that? Was it ever explicitly explained or is just another "magic cave" moment?

Well I think it was just another property of the island, and presumably meant to foreshadow the full time-travel plot of the next season. Although they could have done a lot more with it - used to explicitly explain the Dharma supply drop, for example.

I'm not sure the doctor could have washed up on shore before he was killed, though. That makes no sense!

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The only bits I thought were the constants in the purgitory timeline, i assumed they were all each others constants etc and thats how they remembered..

Except it was Charlie, not Daniel that made Desmond remember.

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Except it was Charlie, not Daniel that made Desmond remember.

Penny was Desmond's constant. Desmond was Daniel's, not the other way round (though that doesn't alter the rest of your point, although Penny made his consciousness jump back again).

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Well I think it was just another property of the island, and presumably meant to foreshadow the full time-travel plot of the next season. Although they could have done a lot more with it - used to explicitly explain the Dharma supply drop, for example.

I'm not sure the doctor could have washed up on shore before he was killed, though. That makes no sense!

The Doctor did wash up on the shore first. They radio the ship and get told the doctor is there alive and well. A few eps later and Keamey slits his throat.

I quite like the idea that the constants were what linked people in the afterlife. Not sure it works under any kind of scrutiny though (Locke's constant is his foot!?).

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What was the point of the 'Constant' stuff from season 4?

It's what kept Desmond from going mental and having his brain melt like Minkowski. It's also assumedly why Daniel didn't get nosebleeds when they were time travelling, he had a constant and spoke to Desmond when they were in the past. What more does anyone want?

I don't understand the whining about answers, and this is a perfect example. The constant was a plot device in the episode of the same name, it was what saved Desmond, at the end there was a reference to Des being Daniels, which if you paid attention you would have seen that he was later. What part of that wasn't explained or used in full?

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It's what kept Desmond from going mental and having his brain melt like Minkowski. It's also assumedly why Daniel didn't get nosebleeds when they were time travelling, he had a constant and spoke to Desmond when they were in the past. What more does anyone want?

I don't understand the whining about answers, and this is a perfect example. The constant was a plot device in the episode of the same name, it was what saved Desmond, at the end there was a reference to Des being Daniels, which if you paid attention you would have seen that he was later. What part of that wasn't explained or used in full?

This.

Also, remember that Daniel had already fucked his own mind, his memory no longer worked properly, but after meeting Desmond it started to improve (he was doing some memory card game with Charlotte on the beach).

Daniel's wasn't Abaddon in either reality, was it?

On the island he had "Desmond Hume is your constant" in his diary, in limboville he started remembering when he met Charlotte.

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It's what kept Desmond from going mental and having his brain melt like Minkowski. It's also assumedly why Daniel didn't get nosebleeds when they were time travelling, he had a constant and spoke to Desmond when they were in the past. What more does anyone want?

I don't understand the whining about answers, and this is a perfect example. The constant was a plot device in the episode of the same name, it was what saved Desmond, at the end there was a reference to Des being Daniels, which if you paid attention you would have seen that he was later. What part of that wasn't explained or used in full?

It didn't really amount much in larger scheme of things, I mean.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Lost – Two Months On.

I loved it. Absolutely loved it. From the beginning of the first series, I wanted to know, how did they end up on that island? How were they going to escape? Then, as the storylines evolved, we learned more about the characters back stories, and the mysteries started to unfold. We learned that Hurley was not only a multi millionaire but also a successful businessman, plagued by bad luck. He blamed the numbers he used on his lottery ticket, claiming they were cursed. He picked those numbers because his friend from the mental asylum used to repeat them over and over again.

At the end of the first series, the survivors of flight 815 found a hatch in the ground, and blew it open with dynamite. Hurley found the numbers were written on the hatch and assumed this to mean that whatever was down there was also cursed. He couldn’t stop the other survivors going down there, and when they did, they found there was a man called Desmond living down there. Jack recognised Desmond as he’d met him years before the plane crash. Meanwhile, Clare had a baby on the island. The others, who we later learn were the islands original inhabitants, tried to kidnap the baby for experimentation. We found out that this was because before Clare, women on the island always died during the pregnancy. Why was this? Was this something to do with the numbers? Was the island cursed? The storylines continued and every week, I was hooked. Even when the third series started to drag, I carried on watching it, reading about it on the internet and googling for clues as to what the numbers might mean. When I heard the series was going to run for six seasons, I was a little concerned that I might give up, but then, the pace of the episodes accelerated, and the show got better still. I loved the fact that from this point the end was in sight, and we knew there was going to be an end to the story. (I have never really regained faith in the way American TV works after seeing the pilot episode of Traveller, a fantastic and very promising show which was cancelled so early that we knew there would only be seven episodes. I loved every minute of that show, assuming that the tight pace and great storyline represented a series with a beginning, middle and end in just seven episodes. But it wasn’t – the last ever episode ended on a mid-season cliffhanger ending like every other episode before it. They’d cancelled the show, but still shown the incomplete series anyway, like there was any point!) Before series 6 started, I watched series 1 to 5 over a period of a couple of months. This was really different to watching one a week for 5 years. Watching the episodes this quickly meant I picked up on lots of story details I had previously missed, and I went into series 6 very much looking forward to seeing how it all worked out.

So I watched the final series and I loved it. I kind of resigned myself to understanding that they were not going to explain all the previous mysteries, and as the number of remaining episodes got fewer and fewer, I just hoped for an ending that made the show wrap up well. I wasn’t disappointed and I had a Lost party and friends came round and we watched that last episode as a group. We all agreed we had liked it.

But now, a couple of months on, for some reason Lost has come back into my conscious. I wondered about buying a BluRay boxset when it comes out, and doing that marathon run again. Because Lost was my favourite TV show and had been for years. And only then did I realise that I didn’t enjoy Lost at all. Ever.

Because Lost was all about the puzzles, and the mystery. And we now know that pretty much every single mystery from the first five series didn’t get answered or explained. When I have previously been gripped by the need to know what the numbers meant, why they gave Hurley such bad luck, or in fact any of the things that I enjoyed so much when watching, I now know they were were just smoke and mirrors. They were meaningless.

If Lost had been cancelled at the end of series 5 like Traveller was, incomplete and unfinished, there would have been an outcry. People would have been so disappointed and would have felt like they had wasted 5 years of their lives watching a show without a conclusion. But instead, they made a sixth series that set up NEW mysteries then explained them, and somehow, I fell for it. I came away thinking it was a good ending, and I was satisfied. But on reflection, I just feel cheated.

Lost wasn’t finished. It was a collection of half written, half explored ideas, woven together so intricately that we believed it was a good show. But without any explanation of what the hell was going on, the beautifully conceived and brilliantly constructed show was just a complete waste of everyone’s time. It’s like a murder mystery novel that slips you clues to the villains identity all the way through, then ends with everyone going to the moon and the murder never being found.

So in summary, I think I have come to the realisation that my favourite TV show for the last 6 years was absolutely fucking nonsense, and there’s no way I can bring myself to watch it again, knowing that it’s just gibberish.

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I realised, when watching a film not about Lost, that I didn't actually know whether this particular corpse in the film was someone we met earlier. It really bugged my girlfriend, but then I realised I didn't really care, I had latched onto a single strand in the film and simply wanted that to come to a conclusion, and all the plot holes surrounding it were fine providing they were beautiful. When I watched La Boheme the surtitles stopped working for a scene, I didn't understand anything except the most obvious of the main characters emotions, but that was the only thing which mattered and it was still surrounded by beauty. That's Lost, bizzarre plots and inconsequential bits I don't care enough to understand, but it looks pretty, sounds pretty and is emotional enough for me to follow the few remaining plot strands to the end and be happy.

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Can't find the tweet or remember who said it, but it was along the lines of "when they say write about what you know, that doesn't mean the two guys who control Lost should write about two guys who control Lost".

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