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Scea Rejected Killer 7 And Viewtiful Joe


bomber
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:wacko: No wonder the PS2 version of Killer7 is only for Europe and Japan:

http://ps2.ign.com/articles/497/497729p1.html

According to IGN's sources, both games were showed to Sony Computer Entertainment America last summer, but Sony turned them down, responding that neither game showed off the PS2's technical strengths well and that Sony might look at them at a later date. Since sales of Viewtiful Joe were respectable for GameCube, it's possible SCEA changed its mind and is indeed considering bringing the cool 2D action game to PS2.

Capcom Entertainment officials, when contacted, had no comment on the games, as neither have been officially announced in North America. We also believe there might be some other snags caused from the SCEA camp, but don't know exactly what they are -- whether they're extra levels, better graphics, price point, We're not sure. Capcom is also believed to be in the works with Viewtiful Joe 2 for GameCube, though Capcom officials again had not comment.

Nice to know their priorities are in the right place. :rolleyes: Games can't even have unique artstyles now? I wonder if they would've rejected Rez if it were released today.

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SCEA are officially the US equivalent of NOE. :rolleyes:

Viewitful Joe was probably rejected because it is "2D". SCEA Nazi's. Not that I care having had the GC version for a long time now.

BTW - Rez might have well have been rejected the number of copies they produced for the US market. It was totally impossible to get when it was released and I had to buy it off Ebay.

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This is a bit bizarre isn't it??

I don't think Viewtiful Jou sold that much (correct me if I'm wrong..) but if even Sony of Japan approves it, and then even Europe, why can't they put their foot down and say if *will* be released???

The people of Sony entertainment from Japan are the overall boss, no?

It's as if ICO would be rejected, except it's made in-house so it's approved...

I can imagine Sony would like to be good partners with Capcom as well, I doubt such things help....

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To stop the release of games purely on the visual style is shocking.

What makes this worse is with the USA seen as the bigest market will decisions like this one put the likes of Capcom etc off doing similair style projects in the future?

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Oh, and what I don't understand is;

but Sony turned them down, responding that neither game showed off the PS2's technical strengths well

How does Killer 7 not look technically impressive? Or Viewtiful Joe to a lesser extent.

Or does it have to mimic real life to be considered 'impressive'? :rolleyes:

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Oh, and what I don't understand is;

How does Killer 7 not look technically impressive? Or Viewtiful Joe to a lesser extent.

Or does it have to mimic real life to be considered 'impressive'? :rolleyes:

A LOT of people think stylised shading like Killer 7 with it's flat colours or Zelda WW's cel shading is technically simpler because the style is visually simpler. Of course the reverse is true, these rendering techniques are MORE difficult to achieve on a technical level than straight texturing.

It's a shame that SCEA feel that way.

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A LOT of people think stylised shading like Killer 7 with it's flat colours or Zelda WW's cel shading is technically simpler because the style is visually simpler. Of course the reverse is true, these rendering techniques are MORE difficult to achieve on a technical level than straight texturing.

It's a shame that SCEA feel that way.

Was getting Pillage through SCEA difficult?

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No. They loved it. They even asked us to make a playable demo for the Official PS2 mag.

Although prior to submission to SCEA we were very worried, and all the advice we had at the time indicated that there could be a high chance of the game being rejected. Which would have killed it completely.

We went a long time without a publisher with Pillage, and you can't do a submission without a publisher, but every publisher wanted to know that SCEA had approved the game before they would consider it - which became a bit of a catch 22.

We had another game at the time which was almost complete without a publisher (for complicated reasons), which seemed a much safer bet to be approved. It surprised us all a little when SCEA enthusiasticaly approved Pillage, but rejected the other game.

Now the other game will never be released.

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That's exactly the reason why a single format must not happen. Ever.

Surely a single format a la CD or DVD - where you don't need a licence to produce content that runs on it - would mean this kind of thing 'rejection' was impossible? It would also mean indie publishers and self-publishing developers and co. would have an easier ride in getting their products to market.

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Although prior to submission to SCEA we were very worried, and all the advice we had at the time indicated that there could be a high chance of the game being rejected. Which would have killed it completely.

We went a long time without a publisher with Pillage, and you can't do a submission without a publisher, but every publisher wanted to know that SCEA had approved the game before they would consider it - which became a bit of a catch 22.

We had another game at the time which was almost complete without a publisher (for complicated reasons), which seemed a much safer bet to be approved. It surprised us all a little when SCEA enthusiasticaly approved Pillage, but rejected the other game.

Now the other game will never be released.

The last game I worked on was set in Victorian England. At a glance SCEA liked what we were doing but thought the lead character should be American and that we change the female character's name. Queue re-recording the entire dialogue and rewriting the script on the whim of Sony US.

Boss then hid head in sand until game was complete in the hope that SCEA would approve it with no changes. Big mistake.

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We had another game at the time which was almost complete without a publisher (for complicated reasons), which seemed a much safer bet to be approved. It surprised us all a little when SCEA enthusiasticaly approved Pillage, but rejected the other game.

Now the other game will never be released.

Ooo more details, more details!

Oh, and POST PIX PLZ :rolleyes:

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Surely a single format a la CD or DVD - where you don't need a licence to produce content that runs on it - would mean this kind of thing 'rejection' was impossible? It would also mean indie publishers and self-publishing developers and co. would have an easier ride in getting their products to market.

The European system is better.

Sony can reject on bugs\quality issues but it's illegal to reject on concept related issues.

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The last game I worked on was set in Victorian England. At a glance SCEA liked what we were doing but thought the lead character should be American and that we change the female character's name. Queue re-recording the entire dialogue and rewriting the script on the whim of Sony US.

Boss then hid head in sand until game was complete in the hope that SCEA would approve it with no changes. Big mistake.

So it was an american in victorian england.

Are you sure you didn't take the idea to the Orange film board from the cinema ads or is that what all approval people are like anyway?

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So it was an american in victorian england.

Are you sure you didn't take the idea to the Orange film board from the cinema ads or is that what all approval people are like anyway?

It made me laugh initially because it's such a cliche about Americans. I remember a Hancock episode from the 50s where they took the piss out of the very same issue (only with movies not games, obviously). Was a lot of additional work though for precisely zero gain.

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The last game I worked on was set in Victorian England. At a glance SCEA liked what we were doing but thought the lead character should be American and that we change the female character's name. Queue re-recording the entire dialogue and rewriting the script on the whim of Sony US.

Boss then hid head in sand until game was complete in the hope that SCEA would approve it with no changes. Big mistake.

Mhmmm makes sense. They reject a game because the lead character doesn't suit them and at the same time are more than happy to destroy Siren with an incredibly poor dub.

This is all very disappointing and sad really. Do Microsoft and Nintendo have a similar system where they can reject games on content? Or is it just SCEA?

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