Jump to content

Selling Out


Hardwired
 Share

Recommended Posts

the band gets royalty payments from the station for playing their song. they get nothing from the advertisers.

Commercial radio stations get all of their money from advertisers. They use the bands to encourage people to listen. The money they pay to the bands comes directly from the advertisers.

the adverts on commercial radio are more likely to remind you of the product, or the station rather than one particular song or artist. unless that station plays the same artist all day long.

That's true, yes.

So what about signing to major labels? Is that considered as selling out as well?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It dilutes the integrity of the music you're creating, because you're enabling someone else to sell their product through your songs, as opposed to just selling your songs.

That's the bit I can't understand. As far as I'm concerened the song remains the same and, no matter how many times I see it used in an advert, it's still the same great song when I listen to it on the album.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Commercial radio stations get all of their money from advertisers. They use the bands to encourage people to listen. The money they pay to the bands comes directly from the advertisers.

the bands they play aren't endorsing any of the products advertised though are they? there this no association between the adverts and the music. they play songs they think their listeners want to hear, not what the advertisers want. this is a very tenuous link (at best) you're making by comparing commercial radio to artists being paid for using their music during an advert, thereby endorsing the product and linking it to the artist/song.

So what about signing to major labels?  Is that considered as selling out as well?
depends on the terms of the contract but, no, it's not in itself an indication of selling out.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As far as I'm concerened the song remains the same and, no matter how many times I see it used in an advert, it's still the same great song when I listen to it on the album.

That's what I reckon, Hardwired.

As far as I can see, it's the same song, and written for the same reasons. Unless someone wrote it with the express intention of selling me cornflakes, I don't see why it should matter.

Edited by Uncle Mike
Link to comment
Share on other sites

this is a very tenuous link (at best) you're making by comparing commercial radio to artists being paid for using their music during an advert, thereby endorsing the product and linking it to the artist/song.

I'm just trying to understand what constitutes selling out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So it's really just adverts then?

selling out? not necessarily. with regards to signing a record contract (major or indie) then like i said, it depends on the terms of the contract in respect to how much artistic control you retain over your work. if the work is seriously compromised then you're selling out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's the bit I can't understand. As far as I'm concerened the song remains the same and, no matter how many times I see it used in an advert, it's still the same great song when I listen to it on the album.

Not to me. My favourite songs remind me of things. Moods, colours, times in my life, someone's face, etc. It's more than just a song, it has context.

If that context shifts to being "That song from that advert", then it's pretty much ruined.

It also makes me respect the band less. It should be beneath them as artists. Writing a song specifically to sell cornflakes would actually have more integrity.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

hopefully it's clearer now?

I understand what you mean by it now, but I still don't think anybody really has the right to say something like that about a band, just because the band wants to make a bit of extra cash. It seems particularly harsh, especially if you don't know all of the circumstances which lead up to them "selling out".

I can understand how it would be negative if they lost artistic control to a large record company and were forced to adapt their music to suit the current market tastes.

However, I don't see it as being negative if they just sell an existing song to be used on an advert. That, in the long run, is going to make the band more money and hopefully allow them to go on to make more records without having to resort to signing a restrictive contract with The Man.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I understand what you mean by it now, but I still don't think anybody really has the right to say something like that about a band, just because the band wants to make a bit of extra cash. 

people should be able to say what they think, surely?

It seems particularly harsh, especially if you don't know all of the circumstances which lead up to them "selling out".
you mean because they maybe hard up? ok i would understand that they did it because they needed the money but they're still selling themselves and their fans out. unfortunately greed would appear to be reason though, generally.
However, I don't see it as being negative if they just sell an existing song to be used on an advert.  That, in the long run, is going to make the band more money and hopefully allow them to go on to make more records without having to resort to signing a restrictive contract with The Man.
interesting point. for example would Aqualung have been able to go on and record a second album had they not received the exposure Strange and Beautiful afforded them having allowed it to be used in a car advert? that song is still tainted to me though.

what you have to consider, ultimately, is whether endorsing a product with one of your songs will add worth to it. will the financial gain outweigh the possible detriment to the song or you as an artist?

Edited by Andy_Tanner
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like when bands do the opposite of selling out, ie after making one of the most critically acclaimed album of the 90s make a totally different sounding one with no singles. (guess the band)

though most bands don't sell out, i suppose to actually sell out you have to start out wanting to make art, not money. trouble is most bands start out putting money first, not making music.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like when bands do the opposite of selling out, ie after making one of the most critically acclaimed album of the 90s make a totally different sounding one with no singles. (guess the band)

Take That? :P

though most bands don't sell out, i suppose to actually sell out you have to start out wanting to make art, not money. trouble is most bands start out putting money first, not making music.

i would have thought most bands started because of their love of music. they probably want recognition too but i don't think making money would be their sole purpose. surely you'd go into stockbroking or something if it was just about money?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

i would have thought most bands started because of their love of music. they probably want recognition too but i don't think making money would be their sole purpose. surely you'd go into stockbroking or something if it was just about money?

you're not telling me that blue are doing it for the good of music?

no its about the money, the girls and the fame.

if your talking about "real" bands then I suppose thats very different, but I can't think of any "real" bands that have sold out massively, they normally don't get a chance. they are either not famous enough or have too sordid lives to promote anything other than drug taking.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

you're not telling me that blue are doing it for the good of music?

no its about the money, the girls and the fame.

to be honest i'm not sure who they are :P i take it they're some kind of manufactured band? in which case i agree but then these guys never had any integrity to lose.

p.s. there aint nothing wrong with money, girls and fame but it should be about the music first and foremost :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

to be honest i'm not sure who they are :(

:(

thats brilliant, that officially gets you on the list of forum people who are cool.

i wish i didn't know who blue were :P

they are basically 4 blokes singing R&B type stuff and are sub-human scum. sub-human scum.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:(

thats brilliant, that officially gets you on the list of forum people who are cool.

i wish i didn't know who blue were :P

they are basically 4 blokes singing R&B type stuff and are sub-human scum. sub-human scum.

i'll have to check them out! seriously though man, i was watching Top of The Pops for the first time in years the other week and i just didn't have a clue who most of them were. i felt completely out of touch and i reminded myself of my dad. frightening really, there was a time when i'd follow the Top 40 religiously. i'm well off the beaten track these days i guess.

Edited by Andy_Tanner
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Recent all-time favourite songs to be somewhat ruined by now associating them with adverts:

California Soul (some fried chicken or other, I think)

Black Steel (some bloody woman feeling free and saying bollocks to it all in a Ford car.)

I am not happy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Was odd that The Fall let that track be used on some car advert (obviously great advert, as I've no idea what the make was).

Selling out has always been a pretty nebulous thing - used to be that signing to a major was considered enough.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i was asked by MTV for some of my music.

told em no.

companies with money are buying the cool factor off bands.. its like getting payment from a very rich but lonely kid to be your friend at school.

in the long run they only dress their product with their money.. it's some trendy cokehead fuck in marketing who's trying to "synergize" some band with their product.. fuck that!

if you can deal with it, fine.. if not dont cry when people see you as someone who compromised their integrity for a quick buck.

I make music for the love of it... if you make music and want to make big money, cut out the risk and start managing / performing / writing for a boyband and bypass the entire feeling, soul and integrity thing altogether.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Moby is a good example of selling out, auctioning off every track from your new album to the advertisers before it's even been released just looks so bad. Especially with the image he had cultivated and his personal lifestyle choices it appeared very hypocritical.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Moby is a good example of selling out, auctioning off every track from your new album to the advertisers before it's even been released just looks so bad. Especially with the image he had cultivated and his personal lifestyle choices it appeared very hypocritical.

He said he did it to keep the company, and his friends, afloat.

I say he's a lying, sell-out bastard.

You can add Metallica and Pitchshifter to the list too. Two bands who changed irrecognisably and sold their ideals out for money. Twats.

Now, Godflesh. There's a band who never let me down, and a band no-one has heard of, I'm sure. 10 years of solid releases, and they quit when it had naturally come to an end. Eternal respect...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I went to see M.O.P. at subterranea in '95 and they went on this big tirade about how white people didn't belong in Hip Hip. they also had the line in downtown swinga "niggahs wanna stop that white shit they be promoting".

4 years later and they toured with eminem.

I consider that selling out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.