Jump to content

BigLime's Horror Fifty


biglime
 Share

Recommended Posts

I even believe it better than Day of the Dead.

Believe?

It IS better than Day of the Dead, which is guilty of a zombie crime of its own.

R.

Day of the Dead is shit, though.

So that's no big surprise.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

biglime's been too soft with this list,

We need hard opinionated critical cynical law laying down.

There's about 15 films in there I never even consider watching again, never mind call them one of the best horror films of all time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

biglime's been too soft with this list,

We need hard opinionated critical cynical law laying down.

There's about 15 films in there I never even consider watching again, never mind call them one of the best horror films of all time.

Call me soft in ten minutes, when it's done.

R.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

THE HORROR FIFTY

In no particular order

1. Jacob's Ladder: as close to Silent Hill as a movie's ever taken us.

2. The Haunting: A masterpiece.

3. Invasion of the Body Snatchers: The remake. One of two Donald Sutherland movies on the list.

4. Don't Look Now: Horrific. Heartbreaking. One of the greatest movies ever made.

5. The Evil Dead: If this list was in order, this might be at the top.

6. Freaks: Like first joining this forum.

7. Dead Ringers: Cronenberg's best work. Not conventional horror, but horror nonetheless.

8. Les Diaboliques: No spoilers...

9. Dawn of the Dead: The best zombie movie. One of the very best horror movies. One of the greatest movies of the 20th Century. I hate you if you don't like this.

10. Scarecrows: A VHS classic. Beautifully edited, little-seen. Find the uncut version.

11. The Others: A modern horror tale without teenagers or tits. Go figure.

12: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: For the first reveal of Leatherface alone, this masterwork belongs in any list of great horror movies.

13. The Changeling: Sometimes, subtlety is the key.

14. The Vanishing: Most certainly NOT the remake.

15. The Thing: Carpenter's greatest movie, among many great movies.

16. The Fog: Carpenter again. Atmosphere? You got it.

17. Dust Devil: Stunningly original, beautifully shot. An occult classic.

18. Lost Highway: A straight-to-hell horror flick. Like being raped in the head by cinema's master rapist. And the soundtrack?

19. Near Dark: Henriksen. Paxton. "Finger-lickin' good!" Essential.

20. The Wicker Man: Britain's greatest horror movie. Genre-hopping and unmatched then and now.

21. Alien: It counts. A haunted house movie set in a spaceship. The original and best, before the concept became unclear.

22. Pet Sematary: Flawed, yes. But also brave, and terribly sad at its core. Some horrific moments set it all off.

23. The Devil's Backbone: Guillermo Del Toro's visionary ghost story. Crushing.

24. Nosferatu: A lot of it started here. Still one of the greatest horror lead performances.

25. Deliverance: A horror movie? Of course it is. Simply one of the most horrifying movies ever made, and with one of the greatest ensemble acting performances.

26. The Omen: Brilliant, and the only one of the trilogy to get on the list, despite Sam Neill's glorious attempts.

27. The Dead Zone: Cronenberg in hands-off mode. He lets the script and the performance from Walken carry it all. It's a haunting and beautiful piece, and necessary on any list of the best horror movies ever made.

28. The Blair Witch Project: A film almost destroyed by the hype surrounding it. Peel away the publicity, and its a horror masterpiece, featuring a deft use of sound that many horror film-makers could learn from. Of particular note is the performance of Michael C. Williams.

29. Night of the Living Dead: One of the most important horror movies ever made. So great, that nothing more needs to be said.

30. Night of the Hunter: As ahead of its time as Citizen Kane, as terrifying as any childhood nightmare... This horror fairytale of good, evil, love and hate, is a movie you must own.

31. Re-Animator: From a golden age of vhs classics. Jeffrey Combs excels in this B-Smash from Stuart Gordon.

32. Rosemary's Baby: Urban horror. Domestic horror. And a story of satanism you can believe in. A Polanski masterpiece.

33. An American Werewolf in London: A horror movie with great comic moments, great performances and a big, big heart. The transformation effects are great even today. And nazi demons with Uzis? Yes, please.

34. The Shining: A frustrating, but frightening movie. Kubrick is a little afraid of the subject matter, but when it comes down to a mastery of terror technique, and delivery of some genuinely nerve-jangling moments, The Shining excels. Nicholson needed an actor's director to restrain him here, but many of his more measured moments are magical.

35. Evil Dead 2: Anyone who was ever a 12-year-old boy at school adores this film. Its the movie you measure your lovers by. If she doesn't hit a shit-eating grin on 'Groovy', dump her.

36. Basket Case: A low-to-no-budget horror classic, this presses all the buttons. Perfect moments of humour, some bizarro performances, and some on-location shooting on the worst sleaze-pit streets in New York add up to something totally unique.

37. The Stepfather: Terry O'Quinn is unforgettable in this clever evolution of the slasher flick. His performance is mesmerising, and proves a psychotic killer doesn't need a mask to chill you to the bone.

38. Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?: A psychological horror film that almost defies categorisation. Bette Davis is at her very best, and the grotesque slide into insanity she perfectly captures disarms you at first with its humour, before stunning you with its stark realism.

39. Suspiria: Not the most terrifying horror film ever made, but certainly one of the most beautiful. Dario Argento gives us a perfect blend of art and slash, and a movie that always has you expecting the very, very worst.

40. The Comfort of Strangers: A misunderstood and truly disturbing psychological horror piece. Beautiful Venice location-work and a haunting Angelo Badalamenti score lend great weight to Paul Schrader's greatest directorial achievement. Any Christopher Walken afficianado who hasn't seen this performance has missed one of the most incredible roles of his career.

41. Creepshow: Romero and Stpehen King. A beautiful homage to the E.C. Comic books, and still one of the greatest attempts at putting the comic book look on the big screen.

42. Angel Heart: Where to begin? With Alan Parker's immaculate direction? With the stunning soundtrack? With the impossibly wonderful cast? Or should we simply point at the brilliant Mickey Rourke, in his greatest role, and lament the fact that he squandered so much of his career? Angel Heart is absolutely perfect, at every turn.

43. The Exorcist: It's become a movie that's fashionable to dislike, but taken on its own, this is a haunting and intelligent horror film. Hype turned the eyes of the world upon the character of Regan, but it's Jason Miller's Father Karras who is the emotional core of the movie.

44. King Kong: A modern cinema without this movie is unimaginable. Indeed, a world without this movie is unimaginable.

45. Misery: This is what psychological horror movies are all about. Isolation, mental cruelty, humour and hysteria. It's all here, with an incredible performance from Kathy Bates, and some of the most quietly violent scenes ever committed to film.

46. The Fly: Cronenberg's re-imagining of the 1958 original sees Jeff Goldblum and Geena Davis share electric screen chemistry in a heartbreaking story of love, life, death and the agony of letting go.

47. Dawn of the Dead (2004): A film I intended to hate. A film that does zombies all wrong (they should NOT run). And a film that is one of the greatest horror movies of the past twenty years. With one of the best opening fifteen minutes in cinema history, a wonderful 'end of days' atmosphere, Johnny Cash, and a moment of comic relief genius, this film is already a modern classic.

48. Jaws: Brilliant in every aspect. Everyone's already spoken about the music and the performances, but it's the editing that sets Jaws apart. Two words: The head.

Jaws1.jpg

R.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

THE HORROR FIFTY

In no particular order

1. Jacob's Ladder: as close to Silent Hill as a movie's ever taken us.

2. The Haunting: A masterpiece.

3. Invasion of the Body Snatchers: The remake. One of two Donald Sutherland movies on the list.

4. Don't Look Now: Horrific. Heartbreaking. One of the greatest movies ever made.

5. The Evil Dead: If this list was in order, this might be at the top.

6. Freaks: Like first joining this forum.

7. Dead Ringers: Cronenberg's best work. Not conventional horror, but horror nonetheless.

8. Les Diaboliques: No spoilers...

9. Dawn of the Dead: The best zombie movie. One of the very best horror movies. One of the greatest movies of the 20th Century. I hate you if you don't like this.

10. Scarecrows: A VHS classic. Beautifully edited, little-seen. Find the uncut version.

11. The Others: A modern horror tale without teenagers or tits. Go figure.

12: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: For the first reveal of Leatherface alone, this masterwork belongs in any list of great horror movies.

13. The Changeling: Sometimes, subtlety is the key.

14. The Vanishing: Most certainly NOT the remake.

15. The Thing: Carpenter's greatest movie, among many great movies.

16. The Fog: Carpenter again. Atmosphere? You got it.

17. Dust Devil: Stunningly original, beautifully shot. An occult classic.

18. Lost Highway: A straight-to-hell horror flick. Like being raped in the head by cinema's master rapist. And the soundtrack?

19. Near Dark: Henriksen. Paxton. "Finger-lickin' good!" Essential.

20. The Wicker Man: Britain's greatest horror movie. Genre-hopping and unmatched then and now.

21. Alien: It counts. A haunted house movie set in a spaceship. The original and best, before the concept became unclear.

22. Pet Sematary: Flawed, yes. But also brave, and terribly sad at its core. Some horrific moments set it all off.

23. The Devil's Backbone: Guillermo Del Toro's visionary ghost story. Crushing.

24. Nosferatu: A lot of it started here. Still one of the greatest horror lead performances.

25. Deliverance: A horror movie? Of course it is. Simply one of the most horrifying movies ever made, and with one of the greatest ensemble acting performances.

26. The Omen: Brilliant, and the only one of the trilogy to get on the list, despite Sam Neill's glorious attempts.

27. The Dead Zone: Cronenberg in hands-off mode. He lets the script and the performance from Walken carry it all. It's a haunting and beautiful piece, and necessary on any list of the best horror movies ever made.

28. The Blair Witch Project: A film almost destroyed by the hype surrounding it. Peel away the publicity, and its a horror masterpiece, featuring a deft use of sound that many horror film-makers could learn from. Of particular note is the performance of Michael C. Williams.

29. Night of the Living Dead: One of the most important horror movies ever made. So great, that nothing more needs to be said.

30. Night of the Hunter: As ahead of its time as Citizen Kane, as terrifying as any childhood nightmare... This horror fairytale of good, evil, love and hate, is a movie you must own.

31. Re-Animator: From a golden age of vhs classics. Jeffrey Combs excels in this B-Smash from Stuart Gordon.

32. Rosemary's Baby: Urban horror. Domestic horror. And a story of satanism you can believe in. A Polanski masterpiece.

33. An American Werewolf in London: A horror movie with great comic moments, great performances and a big, big heart. The transformation effects are great even today. And nazi demons with Uzis? Yes, please.

34. The Shining: A frustrating, but frightening movie. Kubrick is a little afraid of the subject matter, but when it comes down to a mastery of terror technique, and delivery of some genuinely nerve-jangling moments, The Shining excels. Nicholson needed an actor's director to restrain him here, but many of his more measured moments are magical.

35. Evil Dead 2: Anyone who was ever a 12-year-old boy at school adores this film. Its the movie you measure your lovers by. If she doesn't hit a shit-eating grin on 'Groovy', dump her.

36. Basket Case: A low-to-no-budget horror classic, this presses all the buttons. Perfect moments of humour, some bizarro performances, and some on-location shooting on the worst sleaze-pit streets in New York add up to something totally unique.

37. The Stepfather: Terry O'Quinn is unforgettable in this clever evolution of the slasher flick. His performance is mesmerising, and proves a psychotic killer doesn't need a mask to chill you to the bone.

38. Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?: A psychological horror film that almost defies categorisation. Bette Davis is at her very best, and the grotesque slide into insanity she perfectly captures disarms you at first with its humour, before stunning you with its stark realism.

39. Suspiria: Not the most terrifying horror film ever made, but certainly one of the most beautiful. Dario Argento gives us a perfect blend of art and slash, and a movie that always has you expecting the very, very worst.

40. The Comfort of Strangers: A misunderstood and truly disturbing psychological horror piece. Beautiful Venice location-work and a haunting Angelo Badalamenti score lend great weight to Paul Schrader's greatest directorial achievement. Any Christopher Walken afficianado who hasn't seen this performance has missed one of the most incredible roles of his career.

41. Creepshow: Romero and Stpehen King. A beautiful homage to the E.C. Comic books, and still one of the greatest attempts at putting the comic book look on the big screen.

42. Angel Heart: Where to begin? With Alan Parker's immaculate direction? With the stunning soundtrack? With the impossibly wonderful cast? Or should we simply point at the brilliant Mickey Rourke, in his greatest role, and lament the fact that he squandered so much of his career? Angel Heart is absolutely perfect, at every turn.

43. The Exorcist: It's become a movie that's fashionable to dislike, but taken on its own, this is a haunting and intelligent horror film. Hype turned the eyes of the world upon the character of Regan, but it's Jason Miller's Father Karras who is the emotional core of the movie.

44. King Kong: A modern cinema without this movie is unimaginable. Indeed, a world without this movie is unimaginable.

45. Misery: This is what psychological horror movies are all about. Isolation, mental cruelty, humour and hysteria. It's all here, with an incredible performance from Kathy Bates, and some of the most quietly violent scenes ever committed to film.

46. The Fly: Cronenberg's re-imagining of the 1958 original sees Jeff Goldblum and Geena Davis share electric screen chemistry in a heartbreaking story of love, life, death and the agony of letting go.

47. Dawn of the Dead (2004): A film I intended to hate. A film that does zombies all wrong (they should NOT run). And a film that is one of the greatest horror movies of the past twenty years. With one of the best opening fifteen minutes in cinema history, a wonderful 'end of days' atmosphere, Johnny Cash, and a moment of comic relief genius, this film is already a modern classic.

48. Jaws: Brilliant in every aspect. Everyone's already spoken about the music and the performances, but it's the editing that sets Jaws apart. Two words: The head.

49. Poltergeist: There was a time when closedown on TV reminded everyone of this movie. Very few horror films are set in the suburbs, and as a result, Poltergeist made all of our homes a bit less comfortable to live in.

hrpg33.jpg

R.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That was my Poltergeist impression.

What the hell did you think I meant?

I'd like the last one to be Psycho, but I have a sneaky feeling biglime isn't a fan.

I'd have thought maybe if he liked Psycho he could easily have picked North by Northwest, The Birds, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

THE HORROR FIFTY

In no particular order

1. Jacob's Ladder: as close to Silent Hill as a movie's ever taken us.

2. The Haunting: A masterpiece.

3. Invasion of the Body Snatchers: The remake. One of two Donald Sutherland movies on the list.

4. Don't Look Now: Horrific. Heartbreaking. One of the greatest movies ever made.

5. The Evil Dead: If this list was in order, this might be at the top.

6. Freaks: Like first joining this forum.

7. Dead Ringers: Cronenberg's best work. Not conventional horror, but horror nonetheless.

8. Les Diaboliques: No spoilers...

9. Dawn of the Dead: The best zombie movie. One of the very best horror movies. One of the greatest movies of the 20th Century. I hate you if you don't like this.

10. Scarecrows: A VHS classic. Beautifully edited, little-seen. Find the uncut version.

11. The Others: A modern horror tale without teenagers or tits. Go figure.

12: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: For the first reveal of Leatherface alone, this masterwork belongs in any list of great horror movies.

13. The Changeling: Sometimes, subtlety is the key.

14. The Vanishing: Most certainly NOT the remake.

15. The Thing: Carpenter's greatest movie, among many great movies.

16. The Fog: Carpenter again. Atmosphere? You got it.

17. Dust Devil: Stunningly original, beautifully shot. An occult classic.

18. Lost Highway: A straight-to-hell horror flick. Like being raped in the head by cinema's master rapist. And the soundtrack?

19. Near Dark: Henriksen. Paxton. "Finger-lickin' good!" Essential.

20. The Wicker Man: Britain's greatest horror movie. Genre-hopping and unmatched then and now.

21. Alien: It counts. A haunted house movie set in a spaceship. The original and best, before the concept became unclear.

22. Pet Sematary: Flawed, yes. But also brave, and terribly sad at its core. Some horrific moments set it all off.

23. The Devil's Backbone: Guillermo Del Toro's visionary ghost story. Crushing.

24. Nosferatu: A lot of it started here. Still one of the greatest horror lead performances.

25. Deliverance: A horror movie? Of course it is. Simply one of the most horrifying movies ever made, and with one of the greatest ensemble acting performances.

26. The Omen: Brilliant, and the only one of the trilogy to get on the list, despite Sam Neill's glorious attempts.

27. The Dead Zone: Cronenberg in hands-off mode. He lets the script and the performance from Walken carry it all. It's a haunting and beautiful piece, and necessary on any list of the best horror movies ever made.

28. The Blair Witch Project: A film almost destroyed by the hype surrounding it. Peel away the publicity, and its a horror masterpiece, featuring a deft use of sound that many horror film-makers could learn from. Of particular note is the performance of Michael C. Williams.

29. Night of the Living Dead: One of the most important horror movies ever made. So great, that nothing more needs to be said.

30. Night of the Hunter: As ahead of its time as Citizen Kane, as terrifying as any childhood nightmare... This horror fairytale of good, evil, love and hate, is a movie you must own.

31. Re-Animator: From a golden age of vhs classics. Jeffrey Combs excels in this B-Smash from Stuart Gordon.

32. Rosemary's Baby: Urban horror. Domestic horror. And a story of satanism you can believe in. A Polanski masterpiece.

33. An American Werewolf in London: A horror movie with great comic moments, great performances and a big, big heart. The transformation effects are great even today. And nazi demons with Uzis? Yes, please.

34. The Shining: A frustrating, but frightening movie. Kubrick is a little afraid of the subject matter, but when it comes down to a mastery of terror technique, and delivery of some genuinely nerve-jangling moments, The Shining excels. Nicholson needed an actor's director to restrain him here, but many of his more measured moments are magical.

35. Evil Dead 2: Anyone who was ever a 12-year-old boy at school adores this film. Its the movie you measure your lovers by. If she doesn't hit a shit-eating grin on 'Groovy', dump her.

36. Basket Case: A low-to-no-budget horror classic, this presses all the buttons. Perfect moments of humour, some bizarro performances, and some on-location shooting on the worst sleaze-pit streets in New York add up to something totally unique.

37. The Stepfather: Terry O'Quinn is unforgettable in this clever evolution of the slasher flick. His performance is mesmerising, and proves a psychotic killer doesn't need a mask to chill you to the bone.

38. Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?: A psychological horror film that almost defies categorisation. Bette Davis is at her very best, and the grotesque slide into insanity she perfectly captures disarms you at first with its humour, before stunning you with its stark realism.

39. Suspiria: Not the most terrifying horror film ever made, but certainly one of the most beautiful. Dario Argento gives us a perfect blend of art and slash, and a movie that always has you expecting the very, very worst.

40. The Comfort of Strangers: A misunderstood and truly disturbing psychological horror piece. Beautiful Venice location-work and a haunting Angelo Badalamenti score lend great weight to Paul Schrader's greatest directorial achievement. Any Christopher Walken afficianado who hasn't seen this performance has missed one of the most incredible roles of his career.

41. Creepshow: Romero and Stpehen King. A beautiful homage to the E.C. Comic books, and still one of the greatest attempts at putting the comic book look on the big screen.

42. Angel Heart: Where to begin? With Alan Parker's immaculate direction? With the stunning soundtrack? With the impossibly wonderful cast? Or should we simply point at the brilliant Mickey Rourke, in his greatest role, and lament the fact that he squandered so much of his career? Angel Heart is absolutely perfect, at every turn.

43. The Exorcist: It's become a movie that's fashionable to dislike, but taken on its own, this is a haunting and intelligent horror film. Hype turned the eyes of the world upon the character of Regan, but it's Jason Miller's Father Karras who is the emotional core of the movie.

44. King Kong: A modern cinema without this movie is unimaginable. Indeed, a world without this movie is unimaginable.

45. Misery: This is what psychological horror movies are all about. Isolation, mental cruelty, humour and hysteria. It's all here, with an incredible performance from Kathy Bates, and some of the most quietly violent scenes ever committed to film.

46. The Fly: Cronenberg's re-imagining of the 1958 original sees Jeff Goldblum and Geena Davis share electric screen chemistry in a heartbreaking story of love, life, death and the agony of letting go.

47. Dawn of the Dead (2004): A film I intended to hate. A film that does zombies all wrong (they should NOT run). And a film that is one of the greatest horror movies of the past twenty years. With one of the best opening fifteen minutes in cinema history, a wonderful 'end of days' atmosphere, Johnny Cash, and a moment of comic relief genius, this film is already a modern classic.

48. Jaws: Brilliant in every aspect. Everyone's already spoken about the music and the performances, but it's the editing that sets Jaws apart. Two words: The head.

49. Poltergeist: There was a time when closedown on TV reminded everyone of this movie. Very few horror films are set in the suburbs, and as a result, Poltergeist made all of our homes a bit less comfortable to live in.

50. Wes Craven's New Nightmare: A horror movie that says more about horror movies than any horror movie ever made. For all the praise that the terrible Scream garnered for its self-awareness, this film went there first and did it better. It's utterly convincing, a totally out-there concept taken completely seriously, and features a finale which is Lovecraft crossed with Labyrinth. The greatest Nightmare on Elm Street movie, and a perfect way to close the list.

freddys_new_nightmare_1.jpg

R.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Halloween has a great atmosphere, great music...

...but the movie is illogical, boring and not scary in the slightest. There's nothing to think about, and nothing to see.

Carpenter did atmosphere AND fear with The Fog.

R.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.