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The Gamecube


sandman
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And, AGAIN I say to you Linkster, you assured me you could come up with a GameCube exclusive equivilant of GTA. You didn't. You showed me True Crime. Did you expect me to say nothing?

Actually, what you said was this:

"Counter with comparable exclusives mate, because I don't think the Cube caters for the Driv3r/GTA market very well.

My point is that it caters for less markets, yes, and this is one. "

Hence True Crime, which means it clearly does cater for that market. Not as well as if it had GTA, but then that point was obvious. At the time I had no idea you were so narrow minded as to be saying that because it doesn't have Driver, or GTA, then such exclusives as the Cube has to offer (which I had previously listed) were, in your opinion, worthless.

The fact is the GameCube does not cater well for the average casual gamer. In my opinion, anyone on the outskirts of gaming will see the PS2 and Xbox as a more attractive bet. Any market research done by publishers and developers will highlight this point.

Well seeing as we established earlier that this is your personal opinion, I don't see the need to go over old ground.

To be frank, I am not going to delve into petty and personal arguements with people over this. I'm most certainly not going to be told "you're just wrong" flat out by people who don't know me. And I also am not reeling this off from my lecturer, given that I don't studying straight Marketing or any Marketing units (Advertising and PR) in my degree. Any knowledge I have has been off my own back, because of my interest in this subject, related to my course. So until people have something civil or constructive to say, don't expect me to rise to it.

Alas, you've been doing the provoking. Based on what you've posted you still come across as at best naive, but I really don't care whether you take the advice or not. Given your manner and attitude though I can see you're well suited for your chosen career.

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My Final thoughts on Marketing in the Games Industry.

MARKETING.. IN ACTION!!! :lol:

One of the arguements people have used in this thread is that people don't know what they want or need. For one, thats a misunderstanding of the terms "want" and "need". In the marketing context, they don't refer to people wanting a new bike, or needing a tin of beans for their tea.

A want/need is either something simple (like people needing holes in their walls, a la Black & Decker) or an emotion or feeling (like people wanting a sense of being free, a la GTA).

To say these don't exist is a mistake. These theories are theories that marketing has survived and thrived on for the past 50 years.

Tesco are a prime example of a modern day marketing orientated company. Back in the early 90's, their strategy was 'pile it high, and sell it cheap', the complete opposite motto of any marketing company. Then in 1993 came their revolution. After 20 odd years of being #2 in the supermarket world, they shot to #1. Why? They changed their orientation. They realised that selling is more than just, well, simply selling. Studies have shown that their prices have actually risen (in real terms) since their early times, yet so have their sales and their position. How?

Intiatives such as the Value range, Clubcard, the Finest range, what they sell, and the way they sell it have all either arrived or been modified. None of this was done on luck, it was all as a result of extensive and expensive marketing research that revealed that the public didn't enjoy shopping in supermarkets. It was a chore.

No one had a want for the Clubcard specifically, but Tesco saw the loyalty aspect of their research and capitalised on it. And don't be fooled, Tesco make a large amount of their profit each year by simply selling the information of what Clubcard members buy to companies worldwide.

Their fortunes completely changed as soon as they started listening to the "wants" and "needs" of the public, and targetted them effectively.

In relation to gaming, Sony are one of the prime examples of a successful modern marketing orientated company. The PSP isn't a result of creative desire or genius - it's a money making platform based on the "need" public have for credible technology. An add on. Stick the "PlayStation" tag on it (a brand which is infamous for being the most marketing orientated of any brand in any industry) and you're on to a sure fire hit.

Nintendo's DS is more than likely a result of creativity. Creativity is at Nintendo's core, and something that gamers rightly admire. They may argue differently, but I don't think there has ever been a mass want or need for this kind of product with the general public, and the two formats show the distinct difference between the two gaming giants.

MARKETING IN ACTION.. IN THE GAMES INDUSTRY!!! :D

Developer: So, what do you think of our title Alien Shooter 7? Full steam ahead?

Publisher: It's a very polished title, indeed. We're certainly happy with the way things are going, but we do have some suggestions for modifications.

Developer: Uh-huh..

Publisher: Yes. Some of our marketing research has shown that gamers want a bigger sense of freedom. Now we understand that you can't blow the levels open, and let them wander aimlessly, but how about if you break up the order of the missions, and offer the player an option of which mission they want to undertake first?

Developer: Well, yes. That's something we could do. I shouldn't think it would change the game dramatically.

Publisher: Also, some of our research suggests that the market we're aiming for take very well to added drama and suspense. So we've contacted a few music producers who've worked on some killer Hollywood titles and asked them for their ideas for music for the game..

Developer: Right..

Publisher: .. and we were thinking of changing the title of the game to Alien Shooter 7: Return to the Red Planet. That would dramatise the game effectively.

Developer: Well that's certainly do-able.

Publisher: Finally, for the NTSC release, we've pinned in July 4th 2005. The extensive research we've done in the States show that gamers over there have a natural affinity for nationalistic pride, and we figure as the main character is American, it would be stupid to release the title in the original August slot over there.

Developer: Makes sense. I've, err, got something to say actually. How about giving us some fucking money?

Publisher: Erm, no. Not till we've past the 4,000,000 sales mark. :D

----------

The last part is irrelevant to the point I'm making, but I just wanted to suggest to some people in this thread the simple fushion between marketing research results, and an original gaming idea by the developer. It can happen, and it does happen. Now, ok, this is a very simplistic ideal, but I think some people didn't really understand what role marketing could play in gaming.

Now, the game Alien Shooter remains the same, but it has been tailored to suit it's audience more effectively, and would probably sell more as a result.

Anyway.. there's little point in us biting and fighting over small points, over and over. How about we get back to Nintendo? ;)

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Hence True Crime, which means it clearly does cater for that market. Not as well as if it had GTA, but then that point was obvious. At the time I had no idea you were so narrow minded as to be saying that because it doesn't have Driver, or GTA, then such exclusives as the Cube has to offer (which I had previously listed) were, in your opinion, worthless.

Not worthless, no. Just not as effective as Driv3r in targetting the casual gamer. Resident Evil titles are not easy-going in my opinion - it's pretty serious gaming. Not something that generally appeals to casual casual gamers. You've got to stop reading everything I say so aggresively. I'm certainly not writing it like that, fella. ;)

Alas, you've been doing the provoking. Based on what you've posted you still come across as at best naive, but I really don't care whether you take the advice or not. Given your manner and attitude though I can see you're well suited for your chosen career.

Hehe, why thankyou.

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Not worthless, no. Just not as effective as Driv3r in targetting the casual gamer. Resident Evil titles are not easy-going in my opinion - it's pretty serious gaming. Not something that generally appeals to casual casual gamers. You've got to stop reading everything I say so aggresively. I'm certainly not writing it like that, fella. :lol:

Hehe, why thankyou.

You're starting to come across like Cacky. ;)

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Thanks for all the replies

My thoughts after wading through 14 pages...

1 - There is no killer app for the GC yet. Halo and GTA3 (exclusive for long enough on Ps2 ) there is nothing on the GC equivalent yet that appeals to a wide market and offers fantstic gameplay. IMO the new Zelda will be the GC killer app.

2 - Despite Linksters arguements to the contrary, the GC doesn't have as wide a spectrum of games as the Xbox and is a long way behind the PS2.

3 - The GC needs GTA and Driver, and must compensate for not having them by offering alternatives.

4 - I don't think the looks of the GC are in any major way responsible for its success/failure

5 - There does seem to be a lack of massmarket interest in the GC. But, does this matter? Does the GC need massmarket success on the level of the PS2?

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Indeed, as long as Nintendo remain in profit, I'm very happy buying their next console if it's software is up to the quality of the GameCube's.

I think the next Zelda title will indeed be a quality quality release. I'm not sure it'll be able to appeal to the boy racer types that fawn over GTA and Need for Speed alike though. I think it may well be too high brow for that.

I also think the Western market mystifies Nintendo a little, and they can't understand why with the quality of titles on the GameCube available, it isn't up there in terms of sales week-on-week with the PlayStation2.

But I love my GameCube. As long as they aren't in too much financial difficulty, I'm very happy with them. But I do think they hoped for more.

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