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Sega Rally 2005


Bojangle
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personally i'd prefer a ps2 conversion of outrun 2..

outrun 2 is HUGE in japan.

sega is HUGE in japan.

PS2 is HUGE in japan.

why the hell don't they do outrun 2 for PS2? it would sell LOADS.

but, hey, sega rally 3 might turn out good. let's just hope they keep it arcadey and sega-ish.

Because the arcade version was on Chir.. whatever.

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Here are some new images of Sega's PS2 racing game Sega Rally 2005, the latest installment of the popular rally racing game. The game will features a new AGC system (Automatic Generated Course), the layout of the race courses are randomly generated, so you can always play fresh courses. The weather condition, road side objects and race time (day, evening and night) can be both randomly generated or selected in advance. You can use the game save feature to save the race courses to memory card and challenge later.

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It looks very bland and boring too me, Sega Rally was all about bright colours and fun, with helicopters feet in front of you and elephants on the side of the track and huge water jumps.

No it wasn't.

Not really.

Reading the old Sega arcade flyers again, it seems preposterous, but they always crow on about realism in the handling and visuals, even as far back as OutRun. They genuinely thought that they were creating simulations.

The one factor that helped create the distinctive "Sega look" was the limitations of the hardware. Model 2 games always look so colourful because their colour palette was so limited and the texturing capabilities were primative. And as more colours have become available and textures can be far more sophisticated, so the games have become more "muted" as they can get closer to the realism that they always strive for.

The trackside detail was always a case of showing off with the hardware. "Hey look, we've got a hellicopter going overhead, blowing up sand and it's still 60fps!!!"

I think that F355 and NASCAR Arcade were realisations of what Sega were always striving for, but clearly this wasn't the best path and since these games were released the sim handling has been toned down somewhat for accessibility in the likes of Initial D and OutRun 2.

Sega Rally 2005 is a perfect example of technology finally matching the vision that the producers had 10 years ago.

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Judging Sega Rally by screenshots seems a bit daft, especially when the bulk of the game is spent moving, no?

Besides, Sega Rally, regardless of intent or ambition, is gaming heaven. The only thing that bothers me about this title is this random track generator thingy. With tracks like Desert, Forest and Moutain proving to be some of the most cunning and geniunely classic moments in video gaming evar, it just seems a bit daft to leave it all to chance.

Or worse yet, leave it in the hands of the gamer. An affront to God? I think so.

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Judging Sega Rally by screenshots seems a bit daft, especially when the bulk of the game is spent moving, no?

Besides, Sega Rally, regardless of intent or ambition, is gaming heaven. The only thing that bothers me about this title is this random track generator thingy. With tracks like Desert, Forest and Moutain proving to be some of the most cunning and geniunely classic moments in video gaming evar, it just seems a bit daft to leave it all to chance.

Or worse yet, leave it in the hands of the gamer. An affront to God? I think so.

Surely they'll put the original tracks in it? It would be like Gran Turismo without Trial Mountain.

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Surely they'll put the original tracks in it? It would be like Gran Turismo without Trial Mountain.

Maybe, but the thing that bothers me m8 is this idea that more tracks = longevity. Even with 3 tracks (and the secret lakeside), I'd argue that Sega Rally has more longevity than GT and Project Gotham combined. For anyone whose spent endless nights on Sega Rally Time Attack - you know exactly what I'm talking about.

It's just...wrong. Sega Rally 2 was wrong for the same reason. More tracks isn't good. It's like a chips swimming in vinegar, for chuffin sakes.

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Maybe, but the thing that bothers me m8 is this idea that more tracks = longevity. Even with 3 tracks (and the secret lakeside), I'd argue that Sega Rally has more longevity than GT and Project Gotham combined. For anyone whose spent endless nights on Sega Rally Time Attack - you know exactly what I'm talking about.

*raises hand*

more tracks = bad

mastering 3 (well, 4) great tracks which have received the full attention of the design team for many, many man months = heaven

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Are we thinking that loads of tracks is bad because they won't have enough time to perfect them, or bad because it belies Sega Rally's arcade roots?

both.

this doesn't just apply to SR though, it applies to most things for me. arcade roots or no, 3 or 4 great, detailed, thoughtful tracks which have been worked on for months, presented for the player to master, is far more desirable than 75 generic boreathons which blur into one, and have had a couple of days' attention each.

look at Halo - how many maps are widely used at meets and on XBC? 4 tops.

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this doesn't just apply to SR though, it applies to most things for me. arcade roots or no, 3 or 4 great, detailed, thoughtful tracks which have been worked on for months, presented for the player to master, is far more desirable than 75 generic boreathons which blur into one, and have had a couple of days' attention each.

Abso-fucking-lutely. This man speaks the truth.

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I don't see what's wrong with more tracks actually, like that Halo example given if you only want to play 4 maps, then play those 4 maps.

If you only want to drive on 3 circuits, then drive on your 3 preferred circuits...

Anyway,

It may seem that random courses will prevent you from memorizing courses in advance. That's not the case, though. In addition to the random courses, the game will feature a set of non-random courses which were fully designed in advance; some of these will be selectable by default while others will appear as you play through the game. You'll also be able to save your favorite randomly generated courses and replay them as often as you like.

As this is the first home-only Sega Rally game, Sega will be including a number of modes of play designed for the home. The game's main mode of play is a career mode in which you start off as an amatuer and work your way to pro driver status, then aim for top honors at the Sega Rally Championship. A quick race mode lets players race through a series of four courses, all featuring more than ten opponents. Finally, the game's time attack mode allows players to challenge saved random courses and non-random courses.

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I don't see what's wrong with more tracks actually, like that Halo example given if you only want to play 4 maps, then play those 4 maps.

If you only want to drive on 3 circuits, then drive on your 3 preferred circuits...

75 circuits = 1 week spent designing each circuit

5 circuits = 25 weeks spent designing each circuit

guess which has better tracks?

to continue my not-entirely-sure-it's-relevant halo analogy, the only maps of any consequence in Halo1 MP are redemption (or whatever the purple one is called), blood gulch, hang 'em high and sidewinder - I'd much rather have seen more attention paid to those maps than have the other maps (all of which are arse) to choose from.

how many corners from Colin McRae X does anyone actually remember mastering? the courses all blur into one and thus have no charm, personality, excitement or challenge value. which (apart from the vastly superior handling in SR) is why SR pwns them all in the face.

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What if out of those 75 circuits there are 5 which are really really good? Like say, of the quality that you want.

To automatically assume ALL 75 of them are, say, not so good, is a bit premature I'd say.

I've got GT3, and whilst it got a lot of tracks, I doesn't mean I play all of them, but I do like Grand Valley, Trial Mountain, and especially driving a 787B flat out on the Deep Forest Raceway. So, a lot of tracks, but I only play a couple of really really good ones.

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how many corners from Colin McRae X does anyone actually remember mastering? the courses all blur into one and thus have no charm, personality, excitement or challenge value. which (apart from the vastly superior handling in SR) is why SR pwns them all in the face.

A better analogy because although the CMR4 tracks aren't random, they're dull as fuck!

Gran Turismo 3 has a few great tracks, it's the way forward. Take Sega GT 2002 which was supposed to be a GT3 beater. Car handling and graphics are great but there's only a couple of tracks that are great, the rest are just generic filler.

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I don't see what's wrong with more tracks actually, like that Halo example given if you only want to play 4 maps, then play those 4 maps.

If you only want to drive on 3 circuits, then drive on your 3 preferred circuits...

Anyway,

But more often than not, you're forced to play through every track in any given racings games dedicated one player.

For the likes of GT or Project Gotham, this works fine (I suppose), but Sega Rally has never been about peripheral shite or a multitude of options you'll never touch -it's always been about taking the fundamentals of the experience to the extreme.

It's my belief that there's only so much gaming you can take, so heaping too much on our plates seems a bit wasteful. Especially if you're just going to give it to the alley-dwelling Hobo.

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What if out of those 75 circuits there are 5 which are really really good? Like say, of the quality that you want.

To automatically assume ALL 75 of them are, say, not so good, is a bit premature I'd say.

it's usually borne out though, and it stands to reason given usual development timeframes. nobody gives a shit about any CMR track as there have been hundreds. mention Lakeside to a group of rally gamers and one or two are bound to shout 'cunt!'

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It's my belief that there's only so much gaming you can take, so heaping too much on our plates seems a bit wasteful. Especially if you're just going to give it to the alley-dwelling Hobo.

What does that mean? ( as in, my English isn't good enough to understand fully what you mean... ) Heaping too much on your plates?

I guess the reason for the multitude of tracks this time is because it's dedicated for home use, rather than the predecessors which were for quick blasts in the arcade afaik.

We'll see, I've only played Sega Rally one in the arcade, and only a couple of times at that, but I hope it turns out very very good.

I'd certainly want to play it on the PS2, would be great if they used the analog sticks rather than going the F355 route :(

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What does that mean? ( as in, my English isn't good enough to understand fully what you mean... ) Heaping too much on your plates?

I guess the reason for the multitude of tracks this time is because it's dedicated for home use, rather than the predecessors which were for quick blasts in the arcade afaik.

We'll see, I've only played Sega Rally one in the arcade, and only a couple of times at that, but I hope it turns out very very good.

I'd certainly want to play it on the PS2, would be great if they used the analog sticks rather than going the F355 route :(

the PS2 analog sticks should be used under absolutely no circumstances!

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What does that mean? ( as in, my English isn't good enough to understand fully what you mean... ) Heaping too much on your plates?

I guess the reason for the multitude of tracks this time is because it's dedicated for home use, rather than the predecessors which were for quick blasts in the arcade afaik.

We'll see, I've only played Sega Rally one in the arcade, and only a couple of times at that, but I hope it turns out very very good.

I'd certainly want to play it on the PS2, would be great if they used the analog sticks rather than going the F355 route :P

It's a roundabout analogy, i suppose - a game is like a meal: no matter how good it is, there's only so much you can stomach. It's not a very good analogy, but what I'm saying is that when a game offers up a multitude of options, conditions and modes, it all looks a bit daunting and you don't really know where to start. Consider how much you've paid for it too and it would be like having a plate stacked with food from the most expensive restaraunt in town.

I suppose if Sega Rally were a meal, it'd be a ration pack - only with lots and lots of sugar. That and you'd know where the "meat" of the game is. I'll stop now.

the PS2 analog sticks should be used under absolutely no circumstances!

Absolutely. Pressing up for accelerate and down for brake is possibly the most stupid control scheme known to man. Why? Cos there's no middleground, and the transition between the two is just unbearably..."unanalog" (new word).

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