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What I love about One More Day is listening to all the fans moaning about it like how it's the straw that will break the camel's back.

Over the last two years or so Spider-man's readers have put up with:

1) Gwen Stacy having rapidly-aged kids with the Green Goblin that came back to kill Spider-Man

2) Spider-man dying and coming back as a magical brain eating spider-god with retractable bone fangs in his arms

3) Spidey wearing a flying super-robot costume with three extra legs for some reason

4) Spider-man revealing his secret identity to the world even though Gwen Stacy, his first love, fucking died because someone knew who he was

5) Spidey realising point 4 was a fucking dumb idea when someone pops a cap in his aunt

6) Spidey wearing the black costume again. Because the marketing dept wanted to tie into the third movie. And because someone shot his aunt.

And yet they still keep reading. No wonder Joey Q thinks he can get away with this shit.

...

Outside of Tangled Web I don't know the last time a Spider-man ongoing title was worth reading.

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I used to love reading Spiderman. There was a collection they did that was printed by Marvel UK that incorporated Spiderman 2099 and some other comics which I bought every month without fail. Looking back, it's all a bit shit really. I know there's the whole suspension of disbelief in comics, but the clone saga ripped the fucking piss. That's actually where I stopped reading.

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Playing devil's advocate for a moment, I'd like to think that this represents a chance for a new start for Spiderman. I followed the (seemingly) well-worn path of getting out of comics in about 1992 and then back into them, albeit in a more casual way, at the end of 2000. The only Spiderman comic that made any sense to me when I ventured back into a comic shop was the then-new Ultimate Spiderman. The regular continuity version was a mess and, from what I can tell, that trend has continued and maybe even accelerated. Anything that wipes the slate clean might be what the character really needs...

Of course, there might be another deal with the devil in 12 months time, undoing the OMD changes and then - as a bonus - bringing back Gwen Stacy from the dead. She is still dead, right?

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Marvel Universe Spidey has been shit for years and years.

Ultimate Spider-man on the other hand has been bloomin' aces since Issue 1. It may just be the entire history of Spidey rewritten but it's got those awesome deft Bendis touches, and whilst Bagley isn't the best artist artist in the world, the consistency of him doing every issue with BMB really makes the whole bigger than the sum of it's parts. Immonnen has been doing a great job too now and if you want some monthly Spidey kicks, I suggest trying it.

Buy this as well http://clkuk.tradedoubler.com/click?p=20047&a=1043213&g=606309&url=http://www.play.com/Books/Books/4-/3306405/-/Product.html? - over 1000 pages of Lee and Ditko. Truly magical stuff...

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I hate it.

Joe Quesada is a douchebag for doing this, if they can't make decent stories with MJ its the writers fault, plus why does even the old hag have to live again. She's dull, boring, redudant and i hope she's a skrull....hahahahahha

Plus we have th Ultimate Spiderman, Marvel Adventures Spiderman if I wanted a single PP. Pointless.

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Anyone get anything from Father Christmas comic-wise? Here's what Dad Santa randomly brought me:

comic1lu1.jpg

comic2gi0.jpg

Only read the Batman TPB so far and by christ he's the ugliest Batters i've clapped eyes on and compared to the only other Batman i've read (Dark Knight Returns), didn't really do much for me sadly. Anyone have any impressions on the other 2?

I bought the Viz comic but not pictured is the Viz annual (The Pearl Necklace), which is golden. The job adverts on the back for tramps are priceless "Investing in people who shit themselves." is a choice quote :(

2 Chrimbo's ago I got this beauty off the Mrs; a hard back edition of V for Vendetta, read it fairly quickly over the period and lent it to a relative. Got it back last week after some heavy hinting at his christmas buffet and it's still a lovely package :wub: I'm going to go through it again I think.

18312032fr7.jpg

v1bg9.jpg

:lol:

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Christmas comics! I did quite well this year, lets' see.

I finally got Alison Bechdel's Fun House, which I finished before New Year and was able to therefore declare one of the best comics I'd read in 2007. It's wonderful; I'd somehow become concerned that it might be a bit wordy and 'worthy', but it was in fact an all-round delight that I'd left for far too long.

Bryan Talbot's Alice in Sunderland, which is something of a curate's egg for me. Parts of it seem tedious and clumsy, and other parts are really well done. As an exploration of a place it can't compete with Alan Moore's psychogeographical efforts - though to be fair most of his output in that area consists of non-comics work possibly adapted after the fact. But Gull's tour of London in From Hell works a lot better, I think. Still, it's an interesting book that deserves recognition.

Hmm, maybe I didn't get as many Xmas comics as I thought. No, wait, my sister bought me the latest slipcased collections of Fantagraphics' Peantus reprints, which are as magnificent as they've always been. There are always plenty of strips I've never seen mixed in with fondly remembered favourites from the paperbacks of my youth. And she also got me Our Gods Wear Spandex, which is a pretty interesting look at the magical and mythological roots of superheroes - possible links between Lex Luthor and Aleister Crowley, Superman as Golem and so on. All text, but a good read.

I bought myself the second volume of DC's Mad Archives, which collects Mad 7-12 and, like its predecessor, is as fine a collection of comics as you're likely to find anywhere, still reigning supreme as the pinnacle of the form. In fact with those coming out alongside the EC Archives volumes of the horror, crime and war titles, this is a golden age of reprints that everyone should be making the most of.

I found a relatively cheap copy of The Extraordinary Works of Alan Moore, which is a honking great career-spanning interview - easily the best Moore interview I've seen - peppered with some reproductions of hard-to-find strips, illustrations, scripts and so on. Worth it for the drawing from the 'B.J. and the Bear' annual, frankly.

Ah, is that it? I've been having to reorganise my selves, so new additions have already melted in alongside existing volumes. All good results, at any rate, and I'd certainly recommend Fun House to anyone interested in good comics. And the Mad reprints, I'd recommend them to anyone full stop.

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I posted this in another forum:

So with a moderate interest in comics and such like and also putting on Radio 4 when the Radio 2 presenters annoy me, I caught the best part of piece on a US newspaper cartoon strip produced from 1914 to 1944 called Krazy Kat, created by a guy called George Herriman.

The premise of this strip is thus: you've a Cat called Krazy, a mouse called Ignatz and a Dog called Officer Pup. It's set in a fictional, surreal version of a southern US county. So Officer Pup is reffered to as Offissa Pup and so on. Krazy's sex is never revealed and is quite ambiguous (although feminine to my mind) and is in love with the mouse Ignatz, the mouse hates Krazy and throws a brick at Krazy's head at every opportunity, Krazy interprets this acts as one of affection. Offissa Pup then throws Ignatz in jail for his actions.

That's it, the strip which is quite long compared to the 3/4 panel efforts you see these days is entirely centered around a brick coming into contact with Krazy's bonce. How it comes to be is the interesting/funny part. Now from the information i've read, people like Salvidor Dali read this strip and his mates would bring them back from the US for him. It's considered Poetry and Art, partly because the premise never differs allowing for some clever strips. You'll learn more if you listen the Radio 4 bit below. I also like the art style, really unique and the background always changes, strange stuff. Waterstones in Macclesfield has a collection off all the full page strips that appeared sometime in the early 40's and it's got my name on it :lol:

Here's some links:

The BBC Radio 4 piece on Krazy Kat

Wiki entry

Official looking site.

Here's a sample strip I quite like as well, about a Door Mouse:

1922_0121_krazykat_det_650.jpg

Anyone already aware of Krazy Kat?

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Bryan Talbot's Alice in Sunderland, which is something of a curate's egg for me. Parts of it seem tedious and clumsy, and other parts are really well done. As an exploration of a place it can't compete with Alan Moore's psychogeographical efforts - though to be fair most of his output in that area consists of non-comics work possibly adapted after the fact. But Gull's tour of London in From Hell works a lot better, I think. Still, it's an interesting book that deserves recognition.

I was a bit disappointed by this as well. As you say, bits are truly riveting, but there are long sections where I had to force myself to keep going. The lectures on local history were pretty dry, and I really, really hated the way he blended the various panels in with a kind of photoshoppy blur, rather than dividing them up with distinct lines. In fact, I wasn't a huge fan of the art in general. Parts of it are fantastic, as pretty much all of Bryan Talbot's art is, but he dilutes his style a lot with the montages and the scanned pictures with various horrible filters over them.

There's a lot to like in there, but about the only part I can remember really enjoying are the bit about Sid James being South African and the Lewis Carroll reappraisal. I've tried to write a balanced appraisal, but my head's just full of criticisms of the book, and it kills me to dis Bryan Talbot so I'll shut up now.

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Krazy Kat is amazing, amazing stuff. Fantagraphics are in the process of publishing the longer Sunday strips in beautiful and affordable volumes (designed by Chris Ware) - search for 'Krazy and Ignatz' on Amazon or wherever. The latest is due out very soon and they're now reprinting the colour strips, which are all magical. I've also got some of the old Eclipse (I think) reprints which I believe are worth something nowadays. Also a wonderful book on the creator, 'The Comic Art of George Herriman', and a lovely piece of UK promo work which has somehow survived over a decade, a broadsheet-sized sampler of the daily strips on newsprint. I'm a bit afraid to open it these days, sadly.

Something I haven't got yet (and which I ought to remedy ASAP) is 'The Kat Who Walked in Beauty', a lovely collection of the dailies that only weighs in at a tenner or so on Amazon. And away I go.

There's nothing quite like Krazy Kat, thanks for bringing it up here. I am in fact drinking from a Krazy Kat mug right this moment. I had it printed up specially and it shows Ignatz zipping a brick at Krazy while Offissa Pupp bellows "TRANSGRESSION!"

What's the difference between Watchmen and Absolute Watchmen?

I think Absolute Watchmen is a reprint (probably a little larger in dimensions) of the Graphitti deluxe edition of Watchmen - script samples, sketches, illustrations and notes at the back. I think it was recoloured for the Absolute edition, though. I've held off buying it because I have the Graphitti volume, but I could easily crack.

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I was a bit disappointed by this as well. As you say, bits are truly riveting, but there are long sections where I had to force myself to keep going. The lectures on local history were pretty dry, and I really, really hated the way he blended the various panels in with a kind of photoshoppy blur,

Oh God, those melting-ice-cream Photoshop pages are awful. I really don't like the bits in the theatre where he's arguing with himself, either - they feel like pre-emptive apologies for the project and compared to Luther Arkwright then seem quite poorly drawn - as though they've been reproduced three sizes too big. And he gets Sid James' laugh completely wrong and then goes on to use it every five minutes, which really grates.

But then you can turn a ghastly page and be presented with something wonderful. It's vexing. I think as a whole it's a case of trying too hard, especially when compared to, say, some of Eddie Campbell's solo work. I'm sure Campbell puts a tremendous amount of effort into layout and such, but I never feel burdened by it while reading.

I'm curious about One Bad Rat now, because it seems like it might be a bridge between the indulgence of Alice and the storytelling glory of Arkwright...

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I'm curious about One Bad Rat now, because it seems like it might be a bridge between the indulgence of Alice and the storytelling glory of Arkwright...

One Bad Rat is good, although I didn't think it quite deserves the legendary status it's been given, especially compared to the Luther Arkwright - I found the story a little bit flat, but then I suppose pretty much any story seems a bit lifeless after the pan-dimensional sexy car crash that is Luther Arkwright. It's well worth reading though, it’s got an amazing Enid Blyton pastiche and it doesn't hammer home every single point of reference like 'Alice in Sunderland'.

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I think Absolute Watchmen is a reprint (probably a little larger in dimensions) of the Graphitti deluxe edition of Watchmen - script samples, sketches, illustrations and notes at the back. I think it was recoloured for the Absolute edition, though. I've held off buying it because I have the Graphitti volume, but I could easily crack.

Yep, straight-up recoloured, 50% bigger version of the Graphitti edition. The new colours are actually quite nice showing a fair bit more detail. There's a review and comparison here http://www.silverbulletcomicbooks.com/revi...77491411149.htm

I don't generally buy stuff I already own in another form and I've got Watchmen in it's orginal comic form and a 20 year old Titan paperback but the Absolute Editions are just so flippin' sexy and they really are a showcase for the art. The 'New Frontier' one is next on the list, it's as lush as fuck

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It's well worth reading though, it’s got an amazing Enid Blyton pastiche and it doesn't hammer home every single point of reference like 'Alice in Sunderland'.

Yeah, that's another problem. Nothing even halfway clever is allowed to pass without being followed by a page of dialogue explaining the cleverness. It so often seems that Talbot is plagued by doubt and feels the need to justify what he's up to, refusing to trust that the readers are capable of working it out for themselves. In more confident hands, it would have probably been a smaller book. But I guess he did just what he wanted to do, so I should keep quiet until such a time as I produce a lavishly self-illustrated hardback celebration of Northampton that everyone agrees is flawless.

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I posted this in another forum:

So with a moderate interest in comics and such like and also putting on Radio 4 when the Radio 2 presenters annoy me, I caught the best part of piece on a US newspaper cartoon strip produced from 1914 to 1944 called Krazy Kat, created by a guy called George Herriman.

The premise of this strip is thus: you've a Cat called Krazy, a mouse called Ignatz and a Dog called Officer Pup. It's set in a fictional, surreal version of a southern US county. So Officer Pup is reffered to as Offissa Pup and so on. Krazy's sex is never revealed and is quite ambiguous (although feminine to my mind) and is in love with the mouse Ignatz, the mouse hates Krazy and throws a brick at Krazy's head at every opportunity, Krazy interprets this acts as one of affection. Offissa Pup then throws Ignatz in jail for his actions.

That's it, the strip which is quite long compared to the 3/4 panel efforts you see these days is entirely centered around a brick coming into contact with Krazy's bonce. How it comes to be is the interesting/funny part. Now from the information i've read, people like Salvidor Dali read this strip and his mates would bring them back from the US for him. It's considered Poetry and Art, partly because the premise never differs allowing for some clever strips. You'll learn more if you listen the Radio 4 bit below. I also like the art style, really unique and the background always changes, strange stuff. Waterstones in Macclesfield has a collection off all the full page strips that appeared sometime in the early 40's and it's got my name on it :lol:

Here's some links:

The BBC Radio 4 piece on Krazy Kat

Thanks for posting that. All I've heard about the strip before was in The Calvin and Hobbes 10th Anniversary Book, in which Bill Watterson describes it as one of his main influences (along with Peanuts and Pogo). I never really bothered to investigate the strip any further than that though. I'll have a listen to that documentary now.

EDIT - Or I would if it hadn't been broadcast in August! The URL you posted now links to the heavy metal documentary from earlier today. :lol:

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If you look around and you're lucky you might find the hardcover collection of the first five Kat collections that Fantagraphics put out last year. There were only 1,000 copies but I can't imagine it was an instant sell-out, and given that it was only $75 I wish I'd ordered one now.

It's fascinating and wonderful reading through the collections. You can see Herriman's style and bravado develop in a manner similar to a time-lapse film of a rose growing - bear in mind the collections just deal with the Sunday pages, so you can quickly cut through a whole year. The latest volumes (the imminent next one begins in 1941) feature page layouts that put 99% of comics you'll encounter today to terrible shame, and specifically demonstrate a point that Bill Watterson of Calvin & Hobbes frequently liked to make - that modern newspaper strips have been hobbled by reductions in page size and the practice of cramming more strips into fewer pages. Herriman had a huge canvas all to himself once a week, and he filled it with jaw-dropping moonlit desert vistas and used it to experiment freely with the rhythm and flow of his stories.

He wasn't alone, of course; Little Nemo and Gasoline Alley, to pick two popular favourites, will also demonstrate the majesty of history's comics pages. It's pretty much unthinkable these days - you'd be very hard pressed to find dedicated comics as lavish, let alone sections of general newspapers.

You can get an astounding overview of those times in The Smithsonian Book of Newspaper Comics, which you can sometimes find at a decent price if you scour the Amazon Marketplace or Abebooks. There are several editions, just steer clear of the New Smithsonian Book of Comic Book Comics, which is a different book entirely and has some printing issues as I recall. But the original collection is one of those books, like the individual Krazy collections (which should be under a tenner each) where you could scalpel out any given page and end up with something worth framing.

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Buy this as well http://clkuk.tradedoubler.com/click?p=2004.../-/Product.html? - over 1000 pages of Lee and Ditko. Truly magical stuff...

Just get the Essentials....(Black and White Reprints, about 25 issues per book for a tenner each RRP). Marvel do them for all their major lines.

From memory Spidey's "Essentials" have just gotten up to the point OMD seems to have reset too...

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You can get an astounding overview of those times in The Smithsonian Book of Newspaper Comics, which you can sometimes find at a decent price if you scour the Amazon Marketplace or Abebooks.

I must stay out of this thread. Every time I read it I want to buy about 10 new books.

I love Krazy Kat and Little Nemo. I started buying a series of beautiful hardback Little Nemo reprint volumes (by Titan) in the late 80s, but only got the 1st two volumes. I keep meaning to go onto ebay and try to find copies of the rest.

Same with Krazy Kat. I started buying an Eclipse reprint series, but lost track, and more recently picked up a couple of the Fantagraphics reprints, but I can't easily tell which ones I'm missing.

This Smithsonian book sounds interesting. I'm not that well up on these old newspaper comics so there's probably loads of gems that I've never even heard of.

I got excited a few weeks back when The Guardian started a comic supplement with the Saturday edition, but it's rubbish.

I got the 2000ad history book for Christmas (or birthday, not sure), which I really enjoyed. The early days of 2000ad reminded me a lot of my first job at a video game studio in the 80s.

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