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The Watchtower - A thread for all comics


biglime
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I read a couple of less famous Neil Gaiman comics recently.

Harlequin_valentine_cover.jpgsignalvr9.jpg

I wasn't really sure what to make of them (no Airplane quotes please...), and Harlequin Valentine was shorter than I expected. But I liked them.

Superman by Morrison is very variable. Has anyone (other than Alan Moore back in the 80s) ever written a decent Superman comic. Red Son was Ok, Azzarello's effort was poor and I've never read anything even remotely as good as the first 2 movies.

I realise I'm posing this directly after a message referring to Loeb as a hack, but Superman for All Seasons is great.

I enjoyed Mark Waid's Superman: Birthright too, although that was mainly because of Leinil Francis Yu's art.

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I always forget the order, but Dark Victory is the follow up (or maybe comes before?) Long Halloween and is of a similar style.

UniverseX/ParadiseX really aren't as good. I'd stop and leave your memory of EarthX intact

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Invincible is also excellent, much better than The Walking Dead which I find decidely average.

Superman by Morrison is very variable. Has anyone (other than Alan Moore back in the 80s) ever written a decent Superman comic. Red Son was Ok, Azzarello's effort was poor and I've never read anything even remotely as good as the first 2 movies.

I've still got Pride of Baghdad, The Darkness collection, Maus and a few others left to go.

I found The Walking Dead pretty average as well, picked up the first few volumes after I saw people raving about it online but it never really got its teeth into me.

As far as Superman goes, I really like the Death and Return of Superman stories (now available in a massive omnibus edition) - they really get to the core of what Superman is about and why he was important in 20th century American popular culture, in my opinion. I haven't read a lot of Superman stuff but I found all that storyline very compelling, even though I know a lot of die-hard comic heads consider it a bit of a cash in event.

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I found The Walking Dead pretty average as well, picked up the first few volumes after I saw people raving about it online but it never really got its teeth into me.

As far as Superman goes, I really like the Death and Return of Superman stories (now available in a massive omnibus edition) - they really get to the core of what Superman is about and why he was important in 20th century American popular culture, in my opinion. I haven't read a lot of Superman stuff but I found all that storyline very compelling, even though I know a lot of die-hard comic heads consider it a bit of a cash in event.

Doesn't the massive Omnibus heavily cut some bits though (mainly large sections of World Without a Superman/Funeral for a Friend?)

If you can I'd look for the older TPB

Death of Superman

World Without Superman

Return of Superman

...Superman/Doomsday:Hunter/Prey is a okish follow up, but not required.

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I found The Walking Dead pretty average as well, picked up the first few volumes after I saw people raving about it online but it never really got its teeth into me.

Har Har :P

The Walking Dead started off quite well, but I lost interest somewhere in the second volume. It really didn't help that the artist who took over was utter shite. I read up to the third TPB hoping it would get better, but it never did.

In other news, wasn't the latest Scott Pilgrim fantastic?

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Speaking of the Man of Steel, I don't like reading Superman stories that don't involve Jimmy Olsen getting turned into something or other or Superman going a bit harmlessly off the rails for some reason, which means I generally stick to silver-age stuff, so I was pleasantly pleased by the first volume of All-Star Superman. It's a bit like Supreme would be if it could stop winking at you for longer than two panels.

Great fun. And sticking with Morrison-on-Morrison action, the final collection of his Doom Patrol run arrived yesterday, as fantastic as it ever was and including the one-shot "Doom Force" story which is essentially a big laugh at the expense of Rob Liefeld et al (no doubt much more timely on its original release). At any rate the book is worth any price for the privilege of reading the final issue, and now I have a full run up on my bookshelf so I can dip into the world of Monsieur Mallah and the Brain, the Love Glove, the Beard Hunter, Mr. Jones and all the rest without having to rifle through stacks of comics. Curdle your pilgrimage! Buy them all now.

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I can never understand the appeal if Superman, the closest I ever liking him was because of Morrison's all star version. He's just seems so bland, and his villains boring unlike Batman, GL etc.

I'm totally with you there. I loved the bit in Dark Knight Returns where Batman kicks his arse for being an arrogant prick :P

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I can never understand the appeal if Superman, the closest I ever liking him was because of Morrison's all star version. He's just seems so bland, and his villains boring unlike Batman, GL etc.

Red Son. Very good. Also Kingdom Come, although that's technically a DC Universe mash up but Superman is pretty isolated in it and goes mental.

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Just finished Judge Dredd: Origins. I love a good bit of Dredd sometimes even if he's old school. I found the early history of the Judges was really well done and made sense of a lot of Dredd's world. Next up Robohunter and Halo Jones. I'm on a nostalgia trip at the minute.

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I can never understand the appeal if Superman, the closest I ever liking him was because of Morrison's all star version. He's just seems so bland, and his villains boring unlike Batman, GL etc.

Superman's amazing! He's got some awesome foes like Mr. Mxyzptlk, Toyman, Prankster and for Christ's sake Bizarro. He can go back in time and all that, sometimes he's Superboy and he's got a flying dog. History's greatest strongmen are often traveling to his era to challenge him to feats of strength and he's got that crazy double-L thing going on with his acquaintances, and even though he has more than his share of problems he's never too busy to help Jimmy Olsen work out why he's changed into a lobster.

The only problem you can have with Superman is if you read some kind of hopeless modern effort where people have to die and serious points are made. Generally speaking I would say that if Superman doesn't fight a big ape over the course of a year, then it's been a terrible year and you should throw all your issues out.

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Just finished Judge Dredd: Origins. I love a good bit of Dredd sometimes even if he's old school. I found the early history of the Judges was really well done and made sense of a lot of Dredd's world.

I've recently returned to reading 2000ad (from about the start of Origins a year or so ago), and I've been really impressed by Judge Dredd. I presumed it was just 'the strip they couldn't kill' because it's worth so much in merchandising and licensing and as a marketing tool, and would consequently be the worst strip in the comic, with more interesting stuff happening on the strips where the writers have more freedom.

To my surprise it's the best strip in the comic, and there's something really interesting happening (especially for someone my age who was reading Dredd from the age of 7, and grew up with it) - Dredd's changing. He's slowly growing older, changing his opinions and wondering what it was all for. John Wagner is playing with really long, slow character development over months, years, even decades. I'm genuinely fascinated by what's happening in the plot strands woven between the main stories.

I can't think of an an example of this kind of thing happening in any other medium - a single writer who's been writing a popular character regularly for 30 years, who has the skill and vision to keep plot strands ticking and plan changes over real-life timescales, and who has the clout to dictate what happens to the character and the world (despite not owning it).

TV soap operas have long running characters, but the whole tone of the show will change with each new producer, writers change all the time, and soap characters regularly have complete personality transplants to suit the current storyline. I guess there might be other examples in comics I'm not familiar with (Cerebus?), but most long running comic characters usually change creative teams fairly frequently, so you don't tend to get a single writer working on something for decades and still doing great work, and the character and situation is usually locked in a time warp for commercial reasons.

Reading it now, you could almost imagine Wagner finishing it. The End. How brave would that be?

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Superman's amazing! He's got some awesome foes like Mr. Mxyzptlk, Toyman, Prankster and for Christ's sake Bizarro. He can go back in time and all that, sometimes he's Superboy and he's got a flying dog. History's greatest strongmen are often traveling to his era to challenge him to feats of strength and he's got that crazy double-L thing going on with his acquaintances, and even though he has more than his share of problems he's never too busy to help Jimmy Olsen work out why he's changed into a lobster.

The only problem you can have with Superman is if you read some kind of hopeless modern effort where people have to die and serious points are made. Generally speaking I would say that if Superman doesn't fight a big ape over the course of a year, then it's been a terrible year and you should throw all your issues out.

I read alot of Superman incarnations and I only enjoyed like I mentioned Morrison's version, for me its all very dull and I'm trying to like him but I can never get drawn into the character. For me I love love love Green Lantern alot, man I dreamt when I was little I wanted to be a GL:)

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Reading it now, you could almost imagine Wagner finishing it. The End. How brave would that be?

:lol: I think you're right, and I think he should. I don't mind other writers having a shot, but Wagner's the man. It's an incredible achievment. I mean, Dredd's a fascist ballbag by any measure, but it's far and away my favourite comic strip. Amazing character development, the best future city out there, the trademark humour alongside the serious stuff at the heart of the whole thing. I love Dredd.

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Has anyone (other than Alan Moore back in the 80s) ever written a decent Superman comic.

Birthright

Secret Identity

Superman for all Seasons (Loeb is only ever readable when Tim Sale is illustrating)

...are all pretty good, and relatively recent, Superman reads. But you're kind of right, very few people get Supes right, the ongoing monthly title being a prime example, been shit for years (although the last few issues with Geoff Johns are showing signs of improvement). Like Rowan says, if you want some fun ongoing Superman, pick up some Golden/Silver Age JLA stuff, that staff always makes me smile

Anyway, on to more serious matters....

Some details are starting to leak out regarding Mr Moore's next project. Read about it here http://www.comicbookresources.com/columns/?column=13

Never heard of the book it's based on but that looks pretty interesting too

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I took my first steps into Preacher the other night, with Gone To Texas. What can I say? I'll definitely be getting more.

Oh to be in your shoes again :)

Having read the entire run i can hand on heart say it is one of my all time favorite comics

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Some details are starting to leak out regarding Mr Moore's next project. Read about it here <a href="http://www.comicbookresources.com/columns/?column=13" target="_blank">http://www.comicbookresources.com/columns/?column=13</a>

Never heard of the book it's based on but that looks pretty interesting too

It's London: City of Disappearances, edited by Iain Sinclair. It's a fine book, a huge psychogeographical anthology. Moore's piece is a portrait of Steve Moore, another magician / writer / comic writer who long-term Dr. Who fans and Forteans will probably be familiar with. It's a good piece, very rich and firmly in the Sinclair mould. Has a great ending that's a kind of text version of Watchmen's panel transitions.

I don't know about this photo-version as the concept reminds me chiefly of Doomlord and Joe Soap (so in fact it ought to be amazing) but fingers crossed. From the description in the link it sounds like it might be a case of the end piece being an adaptation of a Moore piece rather than something he was directly involved in.

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