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Nintendo Revolution Rumours


Switchblade Honey
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You know what I really want to hear about? I want to hear that Nintendo has commisioned a legion of quality story writers to inspire my games, I want to hear that they have poured millions into real world licences, had intimate corporate links with the links of Ferrari, Honda et al to bring me closer into the world of motor racing, I want to hear how a core programming team of 12 people spent a year playing snooker just to better understand the physics of small balls...

Wow, that's the absolute opposite of what I want to hear tbh.

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.::: That sounds dangerously like being too realistic for it's own good. Why make a problem out of something that is logical in the first place?

Just imagine needing said glass to activate something somewhere else, then you would be forced to play a mini-game of Super Monkey Glass just to activate something else. It would needlessly complicate stuff. You don't need to emulate realism, you need to create a game.

That said, I'm sure the idea can be used properly in a game. Just not as a VR extension.

I'm just talking about that as an example, to differentiate the technology from simple tilt-sensing technology that we've already seen.

It was a very fun little gameplay element in Exile, I see no reason why it couldn't be fun in this circumstance, mind you. As a skill-based activity, there's absolutely no reason why it couldn't be made to be fun in a game. Imagine it's a super-sensitive explosive payload you've got to deliver to a location while there's loads of shit going on all around you - think of the green ball thingys in 'The Rock'. I can see lots of possibilities for fun and japes there.

But basically all I'm saying is adding a gyroscope opens up endless possibilities for puzzles and tasks based around object manipulation in 3D space. That's a potentially rich and un-mined seam of gameplay, to my mind.

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I'm just talking about that as an example, to differentiate the technology from simple tilt-sensing technology that we've already seen.

It was a very fun little gameplay element in Exile, I see no reason why it couldn't be fun in this circumstance, mind you. As a skill-based activity, there's absolutely no reason why it couldn't be made to be fun in a game. Imagine it's a super-sensitive explosive payload you've got to deliver to a location while there's loads of shit going on all around you - think of the green ball thingys in 'The Rock'. I can see lots of possibilities for fun and japes there.

But basically all I'm saying is adding a gyroscope opens up endless possibilities for puzzles and tasks based around object manipulation in 3D space. That's a potentially rich and un-mined seam of gameplay, to my mind.

.::: Yes, I understand what you mean. The problem is that I can see it being abused to promote realism and forget gaming though. HALO 2's "white-button incident" is also something I credit to this. It sounds realistic, logical and sense-making on paper, but in practise it hampers more than it adds.

I'm confident Nintendo will make good game use of such a thing (other example: Donkey Kong Jungle Beat), but I'm horrified about what, say, Ubi Montreal might do with it when they apply it to a Splinter Cell.

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I hope Nintendo don't go too far with all this touch screen/gyro/whatever else, business.

It's nice as a novelty but if it is a fundamental part of the machine then you can't get away from it and you will end up with a slew of gimmicky titles.

Well, you're assuming that it's going to be used as a gimmick rather than integrated as a natural part of the control system for games.

Imagine an FPS where you steer with an analogue stick in your left hand, and fire by pointing a second controller at the screen. Imagine controlling Rag Doll Kung Fu or Dead Or Alive wirelessly, through gestures. Imagine drawing the wind control gestures in Wind Waker in the air, while steering the boat with your other hand.

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Well, you're assuming that it's going to be used as a gimmick rather than integrated as a natural part of the control system for games.

Imagine an FPS where you steer with an analogue stick in your left hand, and fire by pointing a second controller at the screen. Imagine controlling Rag Doll Kung Fu or Dead Or Alive wirelessly, through gestures. Imagine drawing the wind control gestures in Wind Waker in the air, while steering the boat with your other hand.

The problem is that third party developers won't put any of that stuff into a multi format game and Nintendo will be in the same position they are now with regards to multi format releases.

I'm perfectly happy with my Cube for the time being anyway.

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I don't want to have to sit there controller fixed to my chest if I don't want to make any un-needed movements witht his gyro thing.

I don't want it to be a gimic, if it's really well done, then it could be good, but I don't know if 3rd party games will implement it.

I want a harddrive.

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OK, Nintendo have been a bit revolutionary there.

I think that not in this case. IIRC, Taiko no Tatsujin (or whatever the name is), a drum game from Namco for the PS2 was available before with an according controller.

Of course, if we're talking about revolutionary releases from one company, instead of available for one console, Nintendo is the winner.

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I think that not in this case. IIRC, Taiko no Tatsujin (or whatever the name is), a drum game from Namco for the PS2 was available before with an according controller.

It was a 'revolutionary' (translation: fucking odd) decision to use it to control a platformer, though.

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Actual motion sensing with a Gyroscope could be truly revolutionary. Imagine your avatar on screen carrying a glass of water (a la Exile) but you had to actually balance the controller in your hand to keep it steady, and move it around real world space in order to move it in the game world. The possibilities are considerable.

Yes, this certainly seems very exciting. 'Water Handler Revolution' could be an excellent title. But why stop at Water? Possibly an engaging level where your chef avatar has to avoid stacking a 3 story chocolate Gateau could well be incredible.

I can almost see Evian and Sarah Lee lining up to offer sponsorship deals as I type.

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Yes, this certainly seems very exciting. 'Water Handler Revolution' could be an excellent title. But why stop at Water? Possibly an engaging level where your chef avatar has to avoid stacking a 3 story chocolate Gateau could well be incredible.

I can almost see Evian and Sarah Lee lining up to offer sponsorship deals as I type.

.::: We all know it'll become Beertender Revolution after focus-testing.

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oh boy

You know what I really want to hear about? I want to hear that Nintendo has commisioned a legion of quality story writers to inspire my games, I want to hear that they have poured millions into real world licences, had intimate corporate links with the links of Ferrari, Honda et al to bring me closer into the world of motor racing, I want to hear how a core programming team of 12 people spent a year playing snooker just to better understand the physics of small balls, I want to hear the latest rumblings that an amazing current generation product will wow us and destroy all that has gone before by its startlingly simplistic gameplay yet addictive, bible challenging, story and character development.

I couldnt care less if the new nintendo came with a 10K volt generator allowing me to give electro shock therapy to my nearest and dearest, it'll just be another distraction from the current nintendo wasteland

I want, no demand, from the next generation of games, stories that make the hours disappear like a good book will, empathy and immersion to rival the greatest films, thrills to rival the first ton up ride on a clapped out motorbike and joys that seriously challenges my everyday life.

Lets face it, if drugs were as dull as gaming currently is, everyone would be sipping tea discussing Schubert.

Bring me something new or bugger off and stop pestering me

They are bringing you something new.

All you truly want are the same games you have right now and have had since the dawn of the PlayStation with nicer graphics and new stories.

I swear to God, if any of you embittered fuckers had any input on the way things are done at Nintendo we'd still be using SNES controllers.

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All you truly want are the same games you have right now and have had since the dawn of the PlayStation with nicer graphics and new stories.

Yeah, I'm sick to the back teeth of generic uninnovative nonsense like Katamari, Metroid Prime, Half-Life 2, and Vib Ribbon. If only they all used a controller built out of hats with live weasels inside, they could've been interesting.

No offense, just raising the counterpoint that innovative hardware isn't a requisite for innovative software.

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Indeed, but all of the examples you've used there have only been made possible by new technology.

The thing I never understand is why so many people want technologies that power the visual and aural aspects of video games to improve, yet are so utterly resistant to changes in the way we interact with games. That is, after all, the whole point of games - to interact.

If people can come up with a new way of doing things, I'm all for it if it's good. To slam any attempts to do something new as a gimmick is incredibly short sighted.

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Sorry, could you explain? I wasn't aware of any incidents  <_<

.::: The part were Xbox fanboys keep slagging off Sony-enthusiasts about SOCOM's fucked up communication system, and then get it themselves and shut up in the hope that nobody notices.

Well not exactly, but communicating via the White button is rather 'wrong' in practise.

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Indeed, but all of the examples you've used there have only been made possible by new technology.

The thing I never understand is why so many people want technologies that power the visual and aural aspects of video games to improve, yet are so utterly resistant to changes in the way we interact with games. That is, after all, the whole point of games - to interact.

If people can come up with a new way of doing things, I'm all for it if it's good. To slam any attempts to do something new as a gimmick is incredibly short sighted.

New technology, yes, but with essentially the same input systems working on the same sort of processing hardware with the same sort of displays.

Changes in the way we interact with games are fine, but I don't think it's necessary or in many cases practical to just throw something like a tilt sensor into a console. I don't think that the solution to the current gamers' malaise is to build games around doing handstands in front of Eyetoy.

The possibilities of more traditional, practical, and crutially general inputs/outputs haven't been exhausted yet, they just need people to come up with innovative games. Sure, if you want a tilt-sensor-based game, you've got to have a tilt sensor, but if you want to be terrified by a game or go on some epic journey to explore the lives of millions, you probably won't use the thing.

That's what I'm worried about, basically; new input methods which are far too specialised to be of any real use outside of a fistful of titles, or are too impractical (hello Gametrak) for anyone to honestly want to bother with outside of a party.

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Well not exactly, but communicating via the White button is rather 'wrong' in practise.

Not for me.

SOCKATUME: You guys take care of the defense.

SOCKATUME presses the "TALK" button on his radio

SOCKATUME (into radio): Sniper, dealt with the rocket launcher yet?

SNIPER (via radio): He's down.

SOCKATUME presses "TALK"

SOCKATUME: Okay, let's get in there by warthog.

Everyone dives in the warthog.

SOCKATUME: Get ready to jump out.

SOCKATUME sees a rocket arcing towards him.

SOCKATUME: Aaah, fu*BOOMB*

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Not for me.

SOCKATUME: You guys take care of the defense.

SOCKATUME presses the "TALK" button on his radio

SOCKATUME (into radio): Sniper, dealt with the rocket launcher yet?

SNIPER (via radio): He's down.

SOCKATUME presses "TALK"

SOCKATUME: Okay, let's get in there by warthog.

Everyone dives in the warthog.

SOCKATUME: Get ready to jump out.

SOCKATUME sees a rocket arcing towards him.

SOCKATUME: Aaah, fu*BOOMB*

.::: But you are faaaaaaaar from a dime-a-dozen Xbox-fanboy. :D Hell, you can play Metroid Prime. That's some feat nowadays.

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Yeah, I'm sick to the back teeth of generic uninnovative nonsense like Katamari, Metroid Prime, Half-Life 2, and Vib Ribbon. If only they all used a controller built out of hats with live weasels inside, they could've been interesting.

But no-one's arguing that the only way to make innovative games is to introduce new controllers. What you're saying is that you want all controller innovation to stop. Although no-one knows exactly what Nintendo has planned, you don't like it and you're having none of it.

The last couple of times Nintendo has adopted new controller technology, the results have been Mario 64 and Wario Ware Touch, which are some of the best games ever for my money. How well would Metroid Prime have worked with a D-Pad, rather than an analogue stick?

With the increasing EAisation of the industry, there isn't going to be much room for games like Katamari and Vib Ribbon on next-gen consoles. You're going to have a future of Jak & Daxter 9 and Halo 4: Better Graphics, Even Worse Story. Hardwiring innovation into the console itself could be the best step possible to keep interesting games being made.

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