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FishyFish
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I think their handling of the Dalek's re-invention in this story bodes well for the re-introduction of other classic villains, the Cybermen in particular. Their original premise was quite interesting, then over time they became your average rent-a-goon, completely lacking the menace evident in stories such as Tomb of the Cybermen.

If they can go back to the original premise (The 10th planet, their gradual mechanisation over time, and so on), it could be great.

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I think their handling of the Dalek's re-invention in this story bodes well for the re-introduction of other classic villains, the Cybermen in particular. Their original premise was quite interesting, then over time they became your average rent-a-goon, completely lacking the menace evident in stories such as Tomb of the Cybermen.

If they can go back to the original premise (The 10th planet, their gradual mechanisation over time, and so on), it could be great.

fingers crossed for the Cybermen next series then

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I like the fact that the Cyberman head design indicated it was from a much earlier story ... perhaps from the one where they invaded London?

Yup it was definately an INVASION Cyberman head. It was lovely to see. Pleased

my son no end as well.

I think if they do return in Series 2 they deserve a 2 parter IMO.

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I enjoyed it although some of the acting/writing was a bit hit and miss.

Looks like it is still doing well in the ratings.

Daleks exterminate ITV ratings

Julia Day

Tuesday May 3, 2005

ITV1 suffered its one of its lowest ever audiences on Saturday when its lacklustre prime time line-up of reality and quiz shows fell victim to the much-heralded return of the Daleks on BBC1.

None of ITV1's five main evening shows managed to attract more than an 18% share of the available audience, leaving the channel with only a 15.2% share for the day.

The network's failure to find an adequate replacement for Ant and Dec's Saturday Night Takeaway - which regularly pulled in early evening audiences of 7-8 million - has had a disastrous knock-on effect throughout the evening.

The second instalment of Celebrity Wrestling - with D-list grapplers including James "Gentleman Jim" Hewitt and Kate "The Brawler" Lawler - attracted just 3 million viewers, 800,000 down on the audience for last week's debut show and an 18% share.

Celebrity Wrestling proved no match for the much-anticipated return of Doctor Who's deadliest enemy, the Daleks, on BBC1, with 7.8 million, 43% of the available audience, tuning in.

Even Saturday night staple Who Wants to be a Millionaire? failed to lift ITV out of the doldrums with a 3.8 million audience and 18% share, one of its lowest ever audiences.

At the same time 7.3 million were watching Casualty on BBC1 and 2.1 million were glued to the World Snooker championship on BBC2.

And the last two remaining contenders in Hell's Kitchen attracted a 3.3 million audience at 9.35pm to ITV1, a 17% share.

ITV's viewing figures for Saturday were the worst since August 28 last year, also a Saturday, when ITV's ratings sank to a 14.5% share.

However, a spokeswoman for the network said no discussions had taken place about changing the schedule.

ITV1's evening schedule got off to a lacklustre start at 5.30pm with a 2.4 million audience and 18% share for retro music show Hit Me Baby One More Time.

The show came off badly against Graham Norton's Strictly Dance Fever on BBC1 at 6pm, which was watched by 4.1 million, a 28% share.

ITV's Celebrity Stitch Up at 7.45pm added 200,000 to the audience it inherited from Celebrity Wrestling, with 3.2 million viewers and a 17% share.

But the National Lottery show on BBC1 attracted nearly twice as many viewers, averaging 6.2 million between 7.45 and 8.35pm.

Even the news on BBC1 proved more popular than Hell's Kitchen with 3.7 million viewers watching at 9.55pm.

Channel 4 had a success on its hands with a screening of Lord of the Rings: the Fellowship of the Rings between 7.45pm and 11.05pm with an average audience of 3.7 million, an 18% share, outgunning most of ITV's evening line-up.

The JRR Tolkien classic topped a successful week for the station, which recorded its best week of ratings since the end of Big Brother last summer.

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43% audience share is utterly fantastic. I think once the recorded viewings are taken into account the ratings will hit 8.5, its usually been around 500,000 recording it to watch later.

I just hope its gives the BBC the impetus to realise sci-fi/fantasy has huge viewing figures potential.

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43% audience share is utterly fantastic. I think once the recorded viewings are taken into account the ratings will hit 8.5, its usually been around 500,000 recording it to watch later.

I just hope its gives the BBC the impetus to realise sci-fi/fantasy has huge viewing figures potential.

Um, from 43% to 8.5 what?

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I think the only real consistant weak spot is Murray Gold's music. He's all right with the slower stuff - in a generic kind of way - but when it comes to his high tempo stuff he just can't do it. I can't place it but it seems just not right, some of it seems too much like cheapo children's TV music played on a binatone or something.

Agreed. What does everyone else think about the music? How could they improve it?

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Agreed. What does everyone else think about the music? How could they improve it?

Get a different composer?

He was coming out with some real twaddle, talking about how important the music always was to the show (other than the theme I mean). I was watching the Sea Devils at the weekend and my g/f was in the other room - she "thought there was something wrong with the telly."

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Get a different composer?

He was coming out with some real twaddle, talking about how important the music always was to the show (other than the theme I mean). I was watching the Sea Devils at the weekend and my g/f was in the other room - she "thought there was something wrong with the telly."

To be fair, The Sea Devils music was pretty experimental.

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OK, so it's an extreme example. But can you honestly say the music was always a big feature of the show?

Not really, but the overall sound of the music always stayed with me. Is it Dudley Simpson who did a lot of the 70's Who? His stuff has a distinctive "Who" sound, as does Paddy Kingsland's who I believe also did the Hitchiker's music. That regeneration music in Logopolis is pure Hitchikers.

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In respomse to whoever asked about the bodycount in Saturday's episode, it was 200.

I think it's a mistake to be comparing viewing figures to ITV as it seems to be pretty mush in decline as a TV station. However, I appreciate that it's still the BBC's closest rival.

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Frankly, it was better than any of the Dalek stories from my childhood. Genesis is the only one that comes close, and was only 1 year old when that originally aired.

I was 5 and it gave me nightmares up until last week. Really.

Kinda like them now though, the nightmares I mean. When I was younger I used to wake up and scream the house down! Scariest thing I ever saw when I was a young un.

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Frankly, it was better than any of the Dalek stories from my childhood. Genesis is the only one that comes close, and was only 1 year old when that originally aired.

So true. What makes Genesis so scary (least as far as the Daleks are concerned) is that their dialogue is minimal. Most of the shows that feature them, they're wobbling about repeating trivial commands to each other and come over as rather absurd as a result. No such worries this time.

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Most of my childhood sleep was spent running around our estate attempting to evade various armies of marauding Doctor Who villains. The Deadly Assassin/Keeper of Traken version of the Master was a frequent visitor to my nightmares.

I had to leave my copy of the Deadly Assassin novel face down!

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So true. What makes Genesis so scary (least as far as the Daleks are concerned) is that their dialogue is minimal. Most of the shows that feature them, they're wobbling about repeating trivial commands to each other and come over as rather absurd as a result. No such worries this time.

I guess it works because the Daleks themselves (which couldn't really carry a whole story on their own, until Saturday's story) are on the periphery until the end of the story. They are talked about, on a conceptual and political level, but the story is really about the Kaleds, and Davros.

When they finally take over, and give that little speech at the end, it's all the more potent because through the rest of the story, the dialogue between Davros and The Doctor and so on, we know how dangerous they are, on a conceptual level. They're not just perennial villains, wobbling about making their umpteenth appearance for no good reason - they're fucking fascists, and they want to kill everything that isn't like them.

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Not really, but the overall sound of the music always stayed with me. Is it Dudley Simpson who did a lot of the 70's Who? His stuff has a distinctive "Who" sound, as does Paddy Kingsland's who I believe also did the Hitchiker's music. That regeneration music in Logopolis is pure Hitchikers.

Simpson was/is a genius. He also did the theme tune to Blake's 7, which is IMHO one of the best TV show theme tunes ever (the original version, they screwed it up for the last series of Blake's 7 sadly), and also the theme tune for the original 70s version of the Tomorrow People which was also ace.

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Edit - There was already a perfectly good reveal when it stitched Rose up initially. They didn't need to pull the same trick twice.

I've given this a bit of thought and watched the repeat on Sunday.

I'm convinced the Dalek had become self-aware. It was broadcasting a distress signal which attracted the TARDIS in the first place. Then, when the Doctor was in the room, it realised noone was coming ("I am... alone?"). The Doctor flicked the switched and it was yelling "Help me" and "Have pity".

All of this before it knew of the existence of Rose.

The thing had been been ripped out of its place, and prodded and poked for 50 years. You can either think of it as the old two-dimensional evil killing machine in old Dr Who (which I can't stand) or you can think of it as a rounded sentient being, which is what a Dalek is. It feels an emotion - hate - and to discount the possibility of it not discovering other emotions such as fear or hope, both displayed in the episode - it seems that the deepest fanboys are having trouble dealing with it.

This series has skilfully ignored or discarded the baggage of old Dr Who which had suffocated the life out of the series in the 80s and was one of the reasons I hated it. So it is only reasonable and consistent that the new series continues its habit of reintroducing old foes with a new, more logical slant. No-one is black and white in this series.

Besides, I'd hate it if all the episode was is to have been a con trick. I don't want that Dalek back, I want it to have felt the sunlight, and to have died with some dignity and peace. Because that makes for a hell of a lot better of an episode than "Ha ha! April Fool!"

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