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Post Your Gaming Setups


kerraig UK
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It's one of these jobbies (IKEA Poang), which are actually perfect when space is limited:

poang-chair-cushion__46189_PE142931_S4.jpg

Very comfortable, yet light and easy to move, and a perfect fit in combination with the Wheelstand Pro + MS Wheel.

I had one of those and it was great, although the padding isn't the greatest. I used an old duvet to line it. The foot rest is a worthy addition if you are that way reclined.

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I'm putting this up in defence of all those with unpleasant living rooms - mine is a minging clash. My living room carpet is horrific. I have two children under 5 who spend most of their lives pouring drink on it, smearing toast on it and having accidents. I'm not spending anything on flooring until they're older. People on here are snobs :)

Sometimes I look at the AV Forums galleries and I know that, if I stayed single and kept my wild oats away from a woman, I'd have a lovely, Ikea style minimalist home... but having chaos is much nicer.

I bought all the stuff to hide the wires but I can't be bothered... I hate wires.

I only have a 360 under the TV as my Wii and all the retro consoles are upstairs in our spare/games room along with a dartboard.

I have a little box room upstairs that I want to change into my room but until the little ones are older, I'm not bothering as it's currently their play room.

This was what it used to look like.

I think this image alone supports my decision not to bother spending loads of money and time making my house a show home. I will add that this photo was taken while I was at work.

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Why do you have your television in front of a window? Doesn't that completely ruin the image?

It's the only place that it'll fit. I'd like it elsewhere but this would mean that the floor space would disappear and my kids must have enormous amounts of space to run around in circles in* <_<

The sun comes around at about 5pm on that side of the house so it's not that bad. On sunny days, we just close the curtains if we want to watch anything. We only tend to have the TV on in the evening unless my 11 year old is slouched on the sofa watching Hannah Montana... again <_<

*this is not my opinion

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Here's my gaming setup for now. Stereo, no sub, I can barely grab an hour here or there to plonk into anything. Wifebeaten. This is the part of my flat (bathroom aside) that I am satisfied with the least. I was furious about having this mess of wires on display for at least, well, I'm still furious.

Ah yeah, tech specs:

Pioneer 5090 50inch plasma (RIP Pioneer).

Genelec 6020 monitor speakers

Yahama RX-V1065 amp

Popcorn Hour A210

Shitty old Xbox 360

6129389109_c832a0d394_z.jpg

Check it out, that shitty unit plugged wonkily into the wall actually lights up, all different colours!

6129915145_b2b4a065cf_z.jpg

Here's what it looked like before:

6126265687_dfcd42d5c2_z.jpg

And this is my lounge.

6129386645_559635e346_z.jpg

You can see other pictures before and after the renovation I did including my kitchen, bedroom and kid's playroom here in the Adventures in DIY thread. Feel free to add your comments and advice on my interior design choices, I didn't realise this forum was full of experts and enthusiasts in this area. *winky smiley*

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TV1.jpg

Games1.jpg

Games2.jpg

Desk1.jpg

This is mine, used to to be the kitchen in our place, but we built an extension where the garage used to be. Hence plug sockets on the walls where the game shelves are :doh:

The chair is below the shelves on the back wall opposite the TV

Also, the TV is full 3d, and while i know a lot of people here are not into 3d, I think it adds a lot to movies and games. (when its done well)

Welcome your thoughts

Cheers

Alan

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IMPORTANT UPDATE:

Just added a sub to my new audio set-up. It's one sexy bitch, and I love it. An Audio Pro Image B1.29, for those that care. Completely overkill for my needs, but holy fuck it feels good, man.

c79c1fa4.jpg

That's nice but you shouldn't put your sub between your fronts. Put it either behind your viewing area or to the left/right of your fronts.

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That's nice but you shouldn't put your sub between your fronts. Put it either behind your viewing area or to the left/right of your fronts.

This advice is wrong BTW, dunno where you got that snippet from but it's incorrect. A subwoofer plays 100hz and down, 100hz is the point where sound is omnidirectional so you can put a subwoofer anywhere in the room. To find the best place to put the sub, plug the sub in and place it where your viewing position is. Run a test tone of say 40hz and get on your hands and knees and crawl around the floor until you get to a point where the sub is loudest. This is where you put your sub for maximum output. It is usually a corner as there's a gain of 12db when a speaker is placed there, 12db essentially being twice as loud for no extra power. You gain 6db by loading it next to a wall. Yay science!

I make subs so I've done just a bit of reading on the subject. 8)

Regarding the sub behind the sofa thing, mine is currently sat there in a bay window purely because it has more gain there than anywhere else in the room.

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That's nice but you shouldn't put your sub between your fronts. Put it either behind your viewing area or to the left/right of your fronts.

You sir, are very wrong...

The position of the sub is exactly where mine is placed - between the left front and the center speaker.

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This advice is wrong BTW, dunno where you got that snippet from but it's incorrect. A subwoofer plays 100hz and down, 100hz is the point where sound is omnidirectional so you can put a subwoofer anywhere in the room. To find the best place to put the sub, plug the sub in and place it where your viewing position is. Run a test tone of say 40hz and get on your hands and knees and crawl around the floor until you get to a point where the sub is loudest. This is where you put your sub for maximum output. It is usually a corner as there's a gain of 12db when a speaker is placed there, 12db essentially being twice as loud for no extra power. You gain 6db by loading it next to a wall. Yay science!

Similarly really bad advice there I'm afraid.

If you do that then you've got absolutely no idea what the response is like at that point in the room at any frequency other than the frequency of your test tone. Therefore it's extremely likely, since you're listening for nothing other than volume, that you've just found best place in the room to place your subwoofer if you want a peak at the frequency of that test tone. Not only that but you've got no more idea what the response is like at every other frequency that your subwoofer is handling than if you plonked it down completely at random in your room nor how it's positioning is effecting it's sound within the time domain - ie it's decay.

At the end of the day there are just two ways to find the right position for a subwoofer (and subwoofers are by far the hardest speakers to find the best place for - all this bollocks about being able to place them anywhere is just that. Yes you might not be able to localise low frequencies but it'll sound like utter shit in every other respect when you get it wrong)...

A) You spend hours measuring all its frequencies, then tweaking and then measuring again. Ideally with something like REW, a decent mike and a laptop or just a set of test tones, an SPL meter and a spreadsheet if you have to.

B) Spend at least another £250 more on something like the Antimode 8033 Equalizer or similar which will do the job for you and attempt to even out the response wherever you put it.

Ideally a combination of the two, getting it the best you can within physical space and then using an equaliser as the cherry on the top.

The bottom line is if your not willing to spend the time and perhaps money to do it the scientific way then just try it in a few suitable places, listen to it combined with the rest of your kit and if it sounds alright then leave it. Its extremely unlikely to sound it's best or accurate but as long as you're happy with how it sounds that's all that really counts.

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I spent a while fiddling with the various settings on the sub and AVR to get the best sound. Crossover on the receiver set to 80Hz, at max (100Hz) on the sub. Tweaked the phase control and volume on both until the bass sounded loudest. Apart from having the rears too quiet, MCACC on the Pio receiver did a good job of setting up the speakers (size, distance and volume).

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Similarly really bad advice there I'm afraid.

If you do that then you've got absolutely no idea what the response is like at that point in the room at any frequency other than the frequency of your test tone. Therefore it's extremely likely, since you're listening for nothing other than volume, that you've just found best place in the room to place your subwoofer if you want a peak at the frequency of that test tone. Not only that but you've got no more idea what the response is like at every other frequency that your subwoofer is handling than if you plonked it down completely at random in your room nor how it's positioning is effecting it's sound within the time domain - ie it's decay.

First up, you're not denying that boundary loading amplifies frequency response up to about 80hz are you?

If you can EQ your sub, do it. Most people haven't got this as an option and therefore boundary loading their sub by popping it in the corner will gain them performance in terms of pure SPL they never realised they could get for free. I doubt more than maybe half a dozen people on this site have the capabilities and equipment for EQing subs properly therefore it's kinda daft suggesting they should spend upwards of £300 on kit to correctly EQ their piddly home-cinema-in-a-box subs.

For most purposes sticking it in the corner will yield best results for pure SPL but the previous suggestion of placement being 'wrong' between the front speakers is just fucking stupid as low frequency cycles with a wavelength of between 2.8ft and 56ft don't give a fuck where they are unless boundary loaded against a wall or in a corner.

If you want to take frequency response into account you then in turn have to deal with room modes at which point it becomes considerably less fun unless you have a second/third/fourth sub to balance things out which again, isn't something that very many people on this website would even know about, let alone consider doing.

In short; place subwoofers anywhere you like but corners will gain you most output for free.

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Similarly really bad advice there I'm afraid.

If you do that then you've got absolutely no idea what the response is like at that point in the room at any frequency other than the frequency of your test tone. Therefore it's extremely likely, since you're listening for nothing other than volume, that you've just found best place in the room to place your subwoofer if you want a peak at the frequency of that test tone. Not only that but you've got no more idea what the response is like at every other frequency that your subwoofer is handling than if you plonked it down completely at random in your room nor how it's positioning is effecting it's sound within the time domain - ie it's decay.

At the end of the day there are just two ways to find the right position for a subwoofer (and subwoofers are by far the hardest speakers to find the best place for - all this bollocks about being able to place them anywhere is just that. Yes you might not be able to localise low frequencies but it'll sound like utter shit in every other respect when you get it wrong)...

A) You spend hours measuring all its frequencies, then tweaking and then measuring again. Ideally with something like REW, a decent mike and a laptop or just a set of test tones, an SPL meter and a spreadsheet if you have to.

B) Spend at least another £250 more on something like the Antimode 8033 Equalizer or similar which will do the job for you and attempt to even out the response wherever you put it.

Ideally a combination of the two, getting it the best you can within physical space and then using an equaliser as the cherry on the top.

The bottom line is if your not willing to spend the time and perhaps money to do it the scientific way then just try it in a few suitable places, listen to it combined with the rest of your kit and if it sounds alright then leave it. Its extremely unlikely to sound it's best or accurate but as long as you're happy with how it sounds that's all that really counts.

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