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It's decent. A fun, light read considering it was written soley to publicise the Kindle.

Read it yesterday; enjoyed it. Reminded me of his early novella stuff. What I didn't get was:

How come Low Men / Can-Toi were guarding the timeline? Unless he's changing his own fiction, all Low Men are servants of the Crimson King (as evidenced by the Low Men in UR having the bleeding eye sigil). Even if they were no longer working for him they are evil. Or, at the very least, thick. They're certainly agents of the Random.

Anyway, I just can't imagine them doing anything that would preserve order. But hey-ho, it's his fiction and he can decide to do whatever he wants I guess.

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Read it yesterday; enjoyed it. Reminded me of his early novella stuff. What I didn't get was:

How come Low Men / Can-Toi were guarding the timeline? Unless he's changing his own fiction, all Low Men are servants of the Crimson King (as evidenced by the Low Men in UR having the bleeding eye sigil). Even if they were no longer working for him they are evil. Or, at the very least, thick. They're certainly agents of the Random.

Anyway, I just can't imagine them doing anything that would preserve order. But hey-ho, it's his fiction and he can decide to do whatever he wants I guess.

If I had to hazard a guess it would be that

the death of the students in the bus crash was in some way beneficial to the Crimson King, maybe there was a Breaker on board, and the Low Men were sent to stop anymore meddling in ways that would hinder the CK's plans. Though the fact they only took the Kindle rather than kill himn outright does seem odd characterisation for the Low Men.

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If I had to hazard a guess it would be that

the death of the students in the bus crash was in some way beneficial to the Crimson King, maybe there was a Breaker on board, and the Low Men were sent to stop anymore meddling in ways that would hinder the CK's plans. Though the fact they only took the Kindle rather than kill himn outright does seem odd characterisation for the Low Men.

Yeah, good point. I think if you read it that they had a different agenda to the one they mention in the story, that would make sense. Even so, if they were doing that they were quite clever and deceptive, which is a little out of character ;)

LET IT GO, TREB.

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Just finished two back-to-back. Firstly, Christine which is like a male-perspective Carrie but with no real shocks or scares. The characters aren't very well drawn and you rarely feel a sense of peril, although there are some nicely sketched moments (Arnie's parents are the most interesting characters, which is a shame as they get little 'screen time'). King's shown several times that he can make automobiles scary (Trucks; Uncle Otto's Truck; From a Buick 8 ) but ironically, his most famous automotive creation is disappointingly tame. I liked the rock 'n' roll references though.

Next up was The Wind Through the Keyhole. The framing device was stilted and the story of Roland and Jamie thin, but the folkloreish tale buried in the centre was pleasingly written and had some lovely imagery. Personally I think it's time he left that universe alone, though - the 'young Roland' bits were always the least interesting part of the whole fiction as they're essentially Westerns with some scattered North Central Positronics junk heaped up in the corner.

I much prefer the parts that blend the worlds of the Imperium and Keystone Earth, with the Gunslinger in the centre (the parts in Lud and with Blaine, then near the end in Thunderclap, particularly). TWTTK is diverting enough (and definitely worth reading as 'book 4.5' in DT read order) but don't expect anything earth-shattering.

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Next up was The Wind Through the Keyhole. The framing device was stilted and the story of Roland and Jamie thin, but the folkloreish tale buried in the centre was pleasingly written and had some lovely imagery. Personally I think it's time he left that universe alone, though - the 'young Roland' bits were always the least interesting part of the whole fiction as they're essentially Westerns with some scattered North Central Positronics junk heaped up in the corner.

I thought the 3rd book with Roland and the love of his life was the best in the series. The ending was so dark and really explained what a tragic character he was. So more young Roland,. sadly I don't think King is capable of exploring that universe the way it deserves anymore.

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Re-read 1408 last night, and had serious issues getting to sleep. Fuck me, that's one chilling tale.

Oh god yes. '1408' and 'N' are by far the creepiest, most Arthur Machen like stories he has ever written. Genuinely fear inducing they way they play with perception and madness.

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Finished the Wind through the Keyhole on holiday.

Really enjoyed it, especially liked the story about Tim and his dad,

pretty obvious that it was his new Steppa that did the deed

so much so that I told an edited version of the story

(where the tyger turns out to be Tim's dad, and the green fairy is good)

to my four year old. :)

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I thought the 3rd book with Roland and the love of his life was the best in the series. The ending was so dark and really explained what a tragic character he was. So more young Roland,. sadly I don't think King is capable of exploring that universe the way it deserves anymore.

*cough*fourthbook*cough*

Wasteland is the 3rd book. Though Wizard and Glass is the best of the series. One of my favourite books ever, in fact.

Cant believe I didnt know he was writing another book in the series. Yay!

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*cough*fourthbook*cough*

Wasteland is the 3rd book. Though Wizard and Glass is the best of the series. One of my favourite books ever, in fact.

Cant believe I didnt know he was writing another book in the series. Yay!

They've all melded into one mass in my mind :doh:

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Just finishing up 11.22.63 - best thing he's written in 20 years IMHO.

Heartily agree, only it's an old manuscript he tarted up for a release, much like Under The Dome. I hope he's got a vault full of part finished works from the 70s and 80s that he can rework, because his recently written novels such as Duma Key and Lisey's Story were snooze fests.

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Heartily agree, only it's an old manuscript he tarted up for a release, much like Under The Dome. I hope he's got a vault full of part finished works from the 70s and 80s that he can rework, because his recently written novels such as Duma Key and Lisey's Story were snooze fests.

I think unlike Under The Dome this was just an idea he had back in the 70s.

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A web-comic version of Little Green God of Agony should be available on http://www.stephenking.com as of today.

The first horror web comic exclusive to StephenKing.com, The Little Green God of Agony, will go live on October 15th. Stephen King’s short story, the opener of Stephen Jones’s 2011 anthology, A Book of Horrors, and included in Ellen Datlow’s The Best Horror of the Year, Volume Four, tells from the point of view of his doubting nurse the tale of a paraplegic millionaire who wants to exorcise his pain. Adapted by well-known comic artist Dennis Calero (co-creator of Xmen Noir and Devil Inside), the webcomic will run in serial installments on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays for eight weeks.

“I have been a huge Stephen King fan for as long as I can remember,” explained Calero. “To be able to work on ANYTHING with him is an honor. And to make this announcement at New York Comic Con is icing on the cake!“

Read the LGGOA Press Release

More about Little Green God of Agony:

Katherine "Kat" MacDonald is an RN hired to care for wealthy client, Andrew Newsome, who has gone from doctor to doctor trying to find a quick cure for his
lingering pain to no avail. She is convinced that he would overcome the injuries he sustained in an airplane crash but he is unwilling to endure the pain of physical therapy. In desperation, Newsome has hired a healer, Reverend Rideout, who promises to "expel" his pain.

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http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2013/jan/25/stephen-king-gun-control-essay-amazon-nra

Stephen King risks wrath of NRA by releasing pro-gun control essay

Bestselling author and gun owner says 'autos and semi-autos are weapons of mass destruction' in 25-page work for Kindle

Stephen King has entranced millions with tales of dread but his latest volume will read like a horror only to the National Rifle Association and other gun-rights advocates. The best-selling author made an unexpected charge into the national debate on gun violence on Friday with a passionate, angry essay pleading for reform.

King, who owns three handguns, aimed the expletive-peppered polemic at fellow gun-owners, calling on them to support a ban on automatic and semi-automatic weapons in the wake of the December shooting at Sandy Hook elementary school which left 20 children and six adults dead.

"Autos and semi-autos are weapons of mass destruction. When lunatics want to make war on the unarmed and unprepared, these are the weapons they use," King wrote.

He said blanket opposition to gun control was less about defending the second amendment of the US constitution than "a stubborn desire to hold onto what they have, and to hell with the collateral damage". He added: "If that's the case, let me suggest that 'fuck you, Jack, I'm okay' is not a tenable position, morally speaking."

King finished the 25-page essay, Guns, last Friday and wanted it published as soon as possible, given the Obama administration's looming battle with the National Rifle Association and its allies. It was published on Friday on Amazon's online Kindle store, price 99 cents.

The novelist, who has sold more than 350 million books, last year issued a call for the rich, such as himself, to pay more tax. In his latest foray into politics, he acknowledges his liberal inclinations but stresses that he is an unapologetic gun-owner with at least half a foot in the conservative camp of the US divide.

In folksy, salty prose which blends policy prescription with dark humour, King alternately cajoles, praises and insults gun advocates in what appears to be a genuine pitch to change their minds. King kept Barack Obama out of it.

"Here's how it shakes out," the essay begins, before describing 22 ritual steps in which the US experiences a school massacre. Excoriating the media and television voyeurism, he writes: "Sixteenth, what cable news does best now begins, and will continue for the next seventy-two hours: the slow and luxurious licking of tears from the faces of the bereaved."

King recalls that the fictional schoolboy killer in his 1977 novel Rage, which was published under a pen name, Richard Bachman, resonated with several boys who subsequently rampaged at their own schools. One, Barry Loukaitis, shot dead a teacher and two students in Moses Lake, Washington in 1996, then quoted a line from the novel: "This sure beats algebra, doesn't it?"

King said he did not apologise for writing Rage – "no, sir, no ma'am" – because it told the truth about high-school alienation and spoke to troubled adolescents who "were already broken". However, he said, he ordered his publisher to withdraw the book because it had proved dangerous. He was not obliged to do so by law – it was protected by the first amendment – but it was the right thing to do. Gun advocates should do the same, he argued.

The idea that US gun rampages stem from a culture of violence was a "self-serving lie promulgated by fundamentalist religious types and America's propaganda-savvy gun-pimps", he wrote. In reality the US had a "Kardashian culture" which preferred to read and watch comedies, romances and super-heroes, rather than stories involving gun violence.

Much of the opposition to gun control stemmed from paranoia about the federal government, King argued. "These guys and gals actually believe that dictatorship will follow disarmament, with tanks in the streets of Topeka."

He assured gun owners that no one wanted to take away their hunting rifles, shotguns or pistols, as long as they held no more than 10 rounds. "If you can't kill a home invader (or your wife, up in the middle of the night to get a snack from the fridge) with ten shots, you need to go back to the local shooting range."

The mockery continued when he noted semi-automatics had only two purposes: to kill people, and to let their owners go to a shooting range, "yell yeehaw, and get all horny at the rapid fire and the burning vapor spurting from the end of the barrel".

King noted that homicides by firearm declined by 60% in Australia after strict gun controls were introduced. And that about 80 people die of gunshot wounds daily in the US.

In a line sure to affront the NRA, and delight the gun-control lobby, he added : "Plenty of gun advocates cling to their semi-automatics the way Amy Winehouse and Michael Jackson clung to the shit that was killing them."

The essay was published as a Kindle Single, a format launched in 2011 for pieces too long for magazines but too short to be books. In a statement following publication, King said every citizen needed to ponder the fact the US was awash with guns. "If this helps provoke constructive debate," he said, "I've done my job."

I downloaded it this morning, but haven't had chance to read it yet.

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Amazing quote:

"Sixteenth, what cable news does best now begins, and will continue for the next seventy-two hours: the slow and luxurious licking of tears from the faces of the bereaved."

That should be the slogan you see every time they break for adverts.

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I read From a Buick 8 recently and I loved it.

Finished The Wind Through The Keyhole the other night, and I loved that too - though I felt each of the tales ended a little abruptly. Not that much, but I'd have loved a little more.

Can you get that essay from the UK store? EDIT: yes, you can. Bought.

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